Winter Color

Winter has been mild so far here, which is fine with me.  So there are some tiny bits of color scattered around the yard.

First, I must apologize for the quality of some of the pictures – not totally in focus.

Dianthus have survived a couple of freezes really well.

This Globe Mallow (Sphaeralcea munroana) has had some blooms that don’t stay open for more than a day.  It’s a native with dusty green curly leaves and is a good performer in both the summer heat and a mild winter.

Texas Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles japonica) usually has some flowers in January or February.One lone Daffodil has opened up.

Several years ago I bought this at a garden club sale and was told that it was an evergreen fern.  Turns out, it is a native Yarrow with white flowers.  But it is evergreen.

Pittsporoum in a pot provides some green, but the tips of the leaf edges are a little crisp from an earlier freeze.

Another native Yarrow has completely different leaves.  I think this is Moon Dust Yarrow (Achillea ‘Novaachdus’).  It is somewhat evergreen with dusty green leaves and does not reseed.

This hardy Ice Plant is amazing.  It’s been in the same pot on the back porch for years.  In cold weather, the foliage looks a little ragged, but it keeps on blooming even in freezing weather.  The pot is in a corner spot which protect it from harsh winds.

Yes.  I do know that this is a weed.  But the Henbit (Lamium amplexicaule) will be easy to pull out of this pot when I want to get rid of it.

I think it’s pretty, and it is color.  Can’t be too choosy in the winter.

Spectacular sunrises start the day with cheery color.

On a cloud covered morning came brilliant red on the horizon.

While we’re enjoying a mild winter, I realize that further north, a polar vortex has struck with devastating temperatures.  I pray for safety for everyone experiencing this.

“Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.”   Edith Sitwell

That Tree

The photographer of this book, Mark Hirsch, took all the pictures in this coffee-table type book with an iphone.

He spoke at a Master Gardener conference last year.  After about 25 years as a newspaper photographer, he lost his job.  He lives in rural Wisconsin, so he travels a two lane road to and from town.  One day, a cement mixer truck passed his car on the edge of the road to his right.  The chute from the truck came loose and swung around to smash into the front windshield and struck Mark in the head.

During his long recovery and visits to the doctor, he passed by a farmer’s field with a large Bur Oak tree in the center of a corn field.

He became captivated by the tree during the changing seasons.  So Mark decided to take a picture of the tree every day for a year.  This book is the result of that project.

The creativity involved to get different shots that were aesthetically pleasing launched a career as an independent professional photographer.

Congratulations to him for the success of this project.

“Sometimes I arrive just when God is ready to have someone click the shutter.”               Ansel Adams

More Ice Pix

Everything looks picture worthy as I tramp around the ice covered yard.

Ice gives Yaupon Holly a sparkle.

Brr.  No one wants to live here in this cold.

Snapping off of the frozen branches from the Texas Kidneywood bush would be easy.

Possum Haw berries in a globe of ice.  Possumhaw Holly is a great small native tree with multiple trunks.

Icy Red Yucca branches under an overcast sky makes me shiver.

The two preceding pictures show Blue Mistflowers.

At the tip of tall trunks of Desert False Indigo (Amorpha fruticosa), heavy ice keeps the branches from swaying in the wind.

Ice covered rose bushes have an ethereal look.

Spaghetti strands of Dried Mexican Feather Grass flops on the ground.

Dwarf Indian Hawthorn is one of the few evergreen bushes in our yard.  The frosty ice coating is gorgeous.

Tall, thin stems of Obedient Plant form upside down icicles.

Bright red Rose Hip with copper colored Rose leaves provides color in a drab wintry scene.

I enjoy some winter when the harsh weather only comes a few days at a time.  But basically, I’m a warm weather person.

“If winter comes, can spring be far behind?”  Percy Bysshe Shelley

Ice, Ice, Ice

First of the year freeze has come and gone.  Almost, like clockwork, every January, there will be ice in the northern half of Texas.

With just mist in the air and a few drops of rain, ice formed on almost every surface outside, except for concrete areas and roadways.  The grass, Algerita bush, and the evergreen Blue Juniper to the left have ice crystals on them.

The branches of the huge Live Oak behind the backyard are weighted down with ice.  Although we have officially never had this tree examined to determine its age, it’s estimated to be over a hundred years old.

I always worry when the branches touch the ground, fearing they will break.  But, fortunately, the ice usually only lasts a couple of days.

Ice on stems and leaves of dead Cannas becomes a work of art.

Frozen water in a bird bath gives the edges of the concrete a pearlized look.  The glass knob-looking item in the center is actually an antique electrical insulator from a telephone pole.

Thin stems of Gaura are encased in ice.

Green leaves of Desert Bird of Paradise enveloped in ice.

Edged in ice, this trellis has a sophisticated, lacy appeal.

With its multiple tiny stems, a rose bush creates the most fantastic ice sculpture.

Mexican Feather Grass.

Dried Blue Mistflower stems.  Can you tell I’m enamored with the ice?

It’s surprising what lives with freezing temperatures.  These Four Nerve Daisies still have flowers.  What hardy natives they are.

Copper Canyon Daisy ice sculpture.

Pokeweed in a pot.

More rose bushes.

Not sure what this plant is.  Love the look.

Since we only have ice once or twice a year, it’s a real novelty.  So I get carried away with taking pictures.

“One kind word can warm three winter months.”  Japanese proverb

Tribute to David Austin Roses

The famed rose hybridizer, David Austin, passed away recently. Read below about his life and his contributions to the rose world.

https://www.davidaustinroses.com/us/about-us/david-c-h-austin

Even though I live in a climate unfriendly to roses developed in rainy England, last year I decided to give them a try because I loved their form. To me, David Austin has developed a rose form without equal. The David Austin web site had a category that offered roses for hot and dry climates. So I ordered three different roses.

Actually,  I had already bought a David Austin rose, but didn’t know it was one of his.  This is Lady of Shalott.  This has turned out to be one of my most favorite roses.  The color and form are exquisite.  It has a wonderful aroma.

 

This picture of David Austin’s Alnwick rose is from a website.

This one is from my yard. The form isn’t quite the same. But my bushes are only a year old, so I’m hoping the form will come as it matures.

This is also a web picture of The Lady Gardener. This has been the most disappointing one. Mine are so pale that they are a cream colored. Of course, it could be the soil, although we piled up good soil about a foot and a half high before planting.

This Thomas A. Beckett in my yard blooms very prolifically. It’s a true red rose and beautiful.

Another web picture. Abraham Darby looks a lot like Alnwick, except it has a yellow tinge on some petals. Mine has done very well.

There many different types of plants in my yard. Some are native ones, and others are ones that have adapted to this climate. I also have lots of rose bushes. I’ve always chosen ones that do very well here. But since I truly love roses, I had to take a chance with some David Austins. I really appreciate anyone who devotes his/her life to making the world a better place to live, whatever the field where he/she works.

“The rose is a flower of love. The world has acclaimed it for centuries. Pink roses are for love hopeful and expectant. White roses are for love dead or forsaken, but the red roses, ah, the red roses are for love triumphant.” Unknown

Candlelight Tour at Weatherford

After 37 years of a tour of homes at Christmas in a small town, it’s no surprise that it’s difficult to get people to open their homes.  At least, that’s what I assume, since most of the homes this year were small and not unique.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Cultural Center, so we always start at the museum.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Culture Center.  So that’s where we always start.

The western tree is always impressive.

One of the trees is this small pencil tree.

The Loving- Pinner house was built in 1857.  The house is well known because Oliver Loving, the cattle rancher who started the Goodnight-Loving trail, lived there from 1862 to 1866.  This small house with two bedrooms was where he and his wife raised nine children.

Fortunately, most of the year in Texas is warm or hot, so the children could have slept outside on the covered porch.  During the winter, they must have been stacked like firewood on the floor.  The cabinets with the glass doors were in the master bedroom.  The house still has the original porch, doors with hardware, high ceilings, and glass transoms.  But I’m not sure when these cabinets were installed.

This panel has older looking scenes, but there was no mention of age.

This Second Empire French Neo-Renaissance style house was constructed of hand quarried native stone.  Therefore, the outside walls are 20 inches thick.

In the small entry, a spiral staircase was handcrafted.  The banister was made from a single pine tree.  Using heat, it was twisted to fit the curve of the staircase.

The staircase in the back of the house leads from the upstairs down to the dining room.  The house features curved walls in most rooms.

The chandelier over the dining room table is original to the house and is from France.

Bathroom sink installed in old sewing machine cabinet.

This piano is old and extremely heavy.

The gingerbread man on this pillow is three dimensional.

It was a cold, rainy, blustery day outside, but people still came out to see the homes.

“Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking bout how it is soaking in around your green beans.”

Autumn

While our yearly rainfall averages 27 inches, rains in September, October, and November this year have totaled 19.93 inches.  So far the total for 2018 is 28.71, which isn’t that much over the average, but is enough to make us happy.

All this rain has resulted in rutted roads and high water levels on low water crossings.  But the blessings have far outweighed the inconveniences.

Copper Canyon Daisy, a native of the Sonoran desert of Northern Mexico and Southern Arizona, normally blooms in August, when the temperature is the hottest.  But even July and August were rainy, so it finally flowered in late September.

The smell of this stinky plant is not noticeable outside, but is overwhelming in confined spaces.  Pretty flowers at the tip of long stems gracefully wave in the wind.

The color on the ridge behind the house is stunning.  The green of the cedars, the local name for them, make the other colors pop.   These are actually Ash Juniper, post cedar, or blueberry juniper (Juniperus ashei),

Native to Northeastern Mexico and south central U.S, the largest coverage of Ash Juniper is in Texas.  They are a bane to property owners, who push them up with bulldozers because they are so prolific, cover grassland, and draw up water needed for other trees.

The positive aspects are erosion control and shade for wildlife and livestock.  Look closely at the middle lower part of the picture and you’ll see some of our wildlife – a deer.

Some other green is provided by our native Live Oaks.

Looking another direction shows how cedars grow in large expanses.  The birds eat the berries and distribute the seeds a la mother nature’s way.

In the yard, a Red Oak provides bright color.  Another Red Oak, which I neglected to get a picture of, was dark red.

A flock of Robins dropped into the yard this morning bobbing for worms.

This is like one of those puzzles sent on Facebook.  Can you find the robin in this Chinese Pistache tree?  Look to the middle of the picture on the left.

Always enjoy these visitors running to and fro and taking to the air at the least noise or movement.

Hope your autumn has been full of delightful surprises like our rains and beautiful sights.

“Autumn, the year’s last, loveliest smile.”  William Cullen Bryant

Rose Emporium Visit

Back in Brenham at the Antique Rose Emporium, there’s lots to see.

Nice bouquet of roses and Celosia in the seminar meeting room.

On the grounds, there are plenty of flowers to enjoy, like this Country Girl Mum (Dendranthema zawadskii).  They are heirlooms from Russia that bloom in the fall and are spreaders.

A Queen butterfly loves it, too.

The Rose Emporium abounds with many decorating ideas for the yard.

Candle bush or candlestick cassia (Cassia alata), becomes a small tree or large bush.
Pollinators are drawn to the bright yellow blossoms, but it needs warm winters.

Wonder if this structure was originally a keyhole garden.

This bloom was way above my head.  It looks like a Datura or Moon Flower.  Datura stramonium is commonly called Jimson weed, Stink weed, Loco Weed, Thorn Apple, Angel’s Trumpet, Devil’s Trumpet, Devil’s Snare, Devil’s See, Mad Hatter, etc.

Most of these names are the result of the fact that the plant is poisonous and have huge seed pods that are so prickly you can’t handle them.  But when they fall to the ground and decay, the small black seeds fall out and propagate new plants.

To me, the flowers justify growing them.

Cosmos can be used to fill any barren spot in the garden.  They will quickly fill the space.

A small rose, Lynn’s Legacy, spoke to me.  I like the cupped shape of the petals.  Also, that it can be grown in a pot.

Dahlias has always been a flower for the northern United States in my mind because they don’t seem suited for our heat.  So, I was surprised to see one growing there.

That area has better soil than we do.  I don’t know if Dahlias have a chance in our caliche clay soil and extreme heat.

Very pretty and tempting.

Porterweed has attracted a Gulf Fritillary.

At the back of the meeting room, small vases of heritage roses were displayed.  One of the main characteristics of heirloom roses, besides being hardy, is the scent.  So this was a chance to smell them and be enticed to buy some bushes.

Very Texas rose display.

It was a great couple of days to hear wonderful, knowledgeable speakers that came from long distances and to enjoy the gardens.

“I say, if your knees aren’t green by the end of the day, you ought to seriously re-examine your life.”  Bill Watterson, Calvin & Hobbes

Rose Emporium, Part 2

The Antique Rose Emporium is so much fun to visit.

Yes, it is about antique, heritage, or old fashioned found roses, but there’s so much more.  They also sell other types of roses, plus succulents and other plants.

Another draw to this nursery is the large gardens that are perfect for strolling and savoring the smells.  The tall mushroom looking trellis is constructed from heavy rebar.  The rose covering it is either Lady Banks or Peggy Martin.  Both of these are vigorous growers, which is not a strong enough description of either one of them.

A huge stand of Mexican Cigar Plants (Cuphea melvillea) borders two sides of the walkway leading to the chapel, where their seminars are held.

They provide a bright, cheery welcome.

The chapel is off in the distance behind this prairie style planting of Salvias, Pink Muhly grass, roses, Purple Sage, and various other plants.

Morning light behind the grasses give them a nice glow.

I especially like how these clusters look like tiny stacked diamonds sparkling.

This tropical beauty is Sky Vine Thunbergia.  One tall and wide archway is overflowing with this vine.  Such a refreshing look.

The flowers on this bush look like Mexican Oregano but the leaves don’t.  Anyone know what it is.  Please let me know with a comment.

Have a blessed Thanksgiving holiday.  Enjoy your family more than you enjoy the food.

“Thanksgiving dinners takes eighteen hours to prepare.  They are consumed in twelve minutes.  Halftime takes twelve minutes. This is not a coincidence.”  Erma Bombeck

Rose Symposium

Every autumn the Antique Rose Emporium in Independence, Texas, provides two days of free informational sessions.  The speakers are specialists in their fields.

The Rose Emporium is certainly about roses, mostly heritage roses.  But there’s so much more there.

We arrived early to wander around and get pictures without people cluttering the landscape.  Arches define many of the walkways.

The gazebo is surrounded by roses and other flowers.

This might be a Gray Golden Aster.

Lovely fern design.  It looks great but isn’t very comfortable.

Surprised to see a lily still blooming.

Love this Celosia.  There are lots of different varieties.  I’ve been told that they reseed but haven’t had success with that.  Guess I’ll have to buy one every year.

This nursery has lots of garden art, some of it for sale.

Texas Sage ‘Heavenly Cloud’ is a hybrid between L. frutescens ‘Green Cloud’ and L. laevigatum.  It was developed at A & M and grows well in different types of soil.

Think this is a soldier butterfly.  On this nice, cool, sunny day, butterflies were feeding on lots of different kind of flowers.

“As you walk down the fairway of life, you must smell the roses, for you only get to play one round.”  Ben Hogan