Before the Hail

Four inches of rain week before last and six inches last week.  Wow.  What a miracle.  There was also lots of hail that knocked out two windows and damaged trees and plants.

In the garden, some things were shredded by the hail or knocked down.  Usually, there’s a mass of day lilies blooming at this time in two different beds.   Those were beaten down just as their buds were ready to open.

So most of the pictures in this post were taken before the hail.

purplesageHenry Duelberg Salvia (Salvia farinacea “Henry Duelberg’) is one of the hardiest salvias I know about.  It is also called Mealy Sage.  Seven years ago three small plants were put in this raised flowerbed.

This salvia blooms well into the fall.  Swarms of bees buzz around it.  I used to be afraid to pull weeds in the area, but the bees just circle around me, only interested in the plants.

yellowpoppyThis Texas Yellow Primrose (I think) was planted a year ago and continues to bloom and spread out.

yellowflower2

steerA friend watched intently as each photo was snapped.

yellowrosesAll the roses seem to bloom at the same time, no matter what their variety.  It’s like a fairy has sprinkled the flowers on the bushes overnight.  They all die about the same time. Then there is a period of rest before they all are filled with flowers again.

These two bushes with yellow roses are floribundas.

climbingroseThis Madam Norbert De Velleur climbing rose bush has gorgeous clusters of small roses.  Even though I can’t find this particular rose on the internet, I’m reasonably certain its name was copied correctly when it was bought three years ago.

larkspurLarkspur seeds from a friend yielded a great crop.  In fact, they popped up in several flowerbeds around the yard.  That’s okay because they are so cheery.

larkspur2In fact, this is the plant that received the most comments when our Garden Club met here in May.

gladiolasFirst gladiolas of the season just started blooming.  Continuing beauty from such a small investment for bulbs four years ago.

gladiolas2One of the great things about gladiolas is the tall stalk with lots of buds.   The buds start opening from the bottom up.  So as a cut flower, as the bottom flowers wilt, they can be pulled off.  Usually, I cut the stems shorter at that point.  This allows them to last about a week or longer with fresh looking flowers.

The hail is a good reminder to enjoy each day as it happens.  Back to the old adage of taking time to smell the roses.

“When told the reason for Daylight Saving time the old Indian said, ‘Only a white man would believe that you could cut a foot off the top of a blanket and sew it to the bottom of a blanket and have a longer blanket.'”  Author Unknown

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