Romantic Roses

Ahh, February, the month of romance.  I would have chosen a spring month, when roses are blooming.  But, here we are at the latter part of winter.  This is the time to plant roses.  What better gift for a sweetheart than roses?  Maybe, roses and chocolate.

If you buy roses at a florist or grocery store, they will have strong, straight stems and perfectly formed flowers.  They have been breed to sell.  But they won’t have a scent.  So an alternative might be to buy a rose bush and plant it for your sweetie.

This book was written by a lady from Houston.  It focuses on the origin of each particular rose shown, the hybridizer, and significance of the name.

The pictures are fantastic.   Anaïs Ségalas was hybridized by a Frenchman, Jean-Pierre Vibert to honor a French lady poet. A very conventional lady, she wrote “Love, pray, dream, that’s the existence of all women.”  Not very inspiring for females of our time.

Don Juan is probably a rose you recognize.  It was hybridized in Italy and named in the US by Jackson and Perkins.  Named after the seductive legendary lover, it definitely says romance.

A quote about Don Juan, the man:  “Heaven offended, laws violated, girls led astray, families dishonored, relatives outraged, wives ruined, husbands driven to despair.”

Named after a famous German who came to live in Texas in the 1800’s.  He is known for traveling around the Southwest and discovering hundreds of plant species.

Some of the pages in the book are a double spread of a particular rose.  This one is Graham Thomas.  It is a hybridization of Charles Austin and Iceberg.  He was a 20th century gentleman who lived a gentleman’s life.

His friend and rose hybridizer, David Austin,  took him to a field filled with new roses and let Thomas choose which rose would bear his name.

A fun, pretty book.

Now to a very practical book.  Judy Barrett is a lady who has spent a great deal of time growing roses and determining how to be successful doing so.  Because of Texas soils and weather, it can be difficult to grow roses.  The eastern Piney Woods is the only area where it is easy.

The advice is extensive and helpful.

I love the Peace Rose but don’t have one.  Such a sweet look and history.

Old world and antique roses have lovely aromas and are hearty.

Filled with specific hints and information, I highly recommend this book.

“I’d love to have the whole place swimming in roses.”  James Joyce

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