Mishmash

Still hot and dry – typical summer here.  However, we’re blessed with some plants that thrive in hot weather.

A pot of annual Periwinkles brighten a mostly shady spot.  Behind it is a pot of Rosemary (Salvia rosmarinus).

White Gaura (Oenothera lindheimeri) draws lots of butterflies.

Most of these are Queens.

This is not a pretty picture, but its purpose is to illustrate how important it is to plant trees properly.  The root flare is correct.

This is a quote from the Dirt Doctor, Howard Garrett, from a Dallas newspaper article:

“Truth is – the single most important condition for a tree’s health is being planted high with the root flare dramatically exposed. This simple factor reduces stress in trees and basically eliminates pest problems including powdery mildew, black sooty mold, aphids, white scale insects, borers and other insect pests and diseases.”

However, this one is planted too low.

“A tree’s flare being covered by anything is unnatural and unhealthy. Root flares (trunk flares might be a more appropriate term) are transition zones and more part of the trunks than roots. When properly exposed they are able to breathe. When covered by ground covers and vines or any kind of soil or mulch – including gravel or stones – the flare cannot breathe properly, stress sets in and pest problems result. The reason crape myrtles aren’t dying all around is that they are incredibly tough and can tolerate the abuse to a degree. However, crape myrtles planted too deeply will have to be treated for pests more often, grow slower and flower less.”

Could be the reason this particular Crape Myrtle isn’t blooming well.

Although they’re not seen in this picture, hummingbirds and bees have been dancing in this Desert Bubba Willow (Chilopsis linearis) .  Just flitting from flower to flower enjoying the sweet nectar.

Pollinators of all sorts dine at this Desert Bird of Paradise (Caesalpinia gilliesii).

Gardening is fun, but it’s also hard work.  Knowing the tricks of the trade helps us be a success.  One way to do this is to take advantage of gardening videos on line.  With the current situation, we’ll home more, so we can use that time to learn.  I enjoy them all, but it’s most helpful to find those filmed in your own area or state.

“My barn has burned down, and now I can see the moon”   Japanese haiku

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