On the Road…

We’ve been living like moles, shut in our house, like the rest of the country.  This Coronavirus time will go down in history as a unprecedented time of individual isolation and challenges.

But for all Texans, the call of wildflowers is strong this time of the year.  So we grabbed some snacks and continued with the isolation, but in our car.

Heading south into the Hill Country, the fields are full of wildflowers.

From the highway, it was hard to distinguish what the white flowers were.

Up close, it was easy to identify them as White Prickly Poppy (Argemone albifora ‘texana’).  Since it’s so early in the spring, they are short but will grow to about 30″ tall.

Note the prickly leaves.  Before we moved from the city to the country, these were unfamiliar.  But now, they’re one of my favorites.  Even though the pedals are thin and delicate, they withstand strong wind.

The Bluebonnets along the highway grow in tall grass, so that only the flowers are visible.  There are no shoulders along the highways in the Hill Country, which is unusual for Texas.  Therefore, it’s difficult to find a spot to park for picture taking.  Maybe, this is by design because too much foot traffic can damage the flowers.

Anyway, we found a space to park.  As I was stepping carefully around the flowers, these bright Wine Cups (Callirhoë  involucrata) grabbed my attention.

Finally, I was able to get a close-up of the beloved state flower, Texas Bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis).  Although there are several different bluebonnets, these are the most common.

Another favorite in Texas are the Indian Paintbrushes or Texas Paintbrushes (Castilleja indivisa).  Their color makes a nice contrast to the Bluebonnets.

Leaving the highway and turning onto a small road, this Texas Redbud (Cercis canadensis var. texensis) still looks great.  Known for their ability to grow in the worst possible soil, Redbuds are short lived and are just about at the end of their glory time.

Most Texas wildflowers are tiny and low to the grown and unidentifiable to the average person.  These flowers are about 3/4″ wide.

These were less than half of an inch across.

There are lots of yellow flowers that unfortunately look so much alike that I can’t name them.

We spotted an old cemetery off the highway.  These are great places for peaceful reflection, quiet walks, and for seeing some flowers.

Oxford Cemetery has both old and new tombstones.

The older stones have an uniqueness and aging that make them attractive.

Sadly, many older graves are for young infants because their mortality rates were so high in the 1880’s.

It took me awhile to identify these because they are so low to the ground.  Spiderwort (Tradescantia virginiana) is usually much taller.

I love the fact that at some point, someone cared enough and took the time to plant Irises in different places in this cemetery.

As long as people aren’t in groups now, the great outdoors is still available for walks and soul renewal.

“Overnight successes are generally years in the making.  And most progress is made in isolation, far from the public eye.”     Andrew Yang

2 thoughts on “On the Road…

  1. Nice post – as far as those tiny yellow flowers you can’t tell apart, somewhere I heard them called DYG – for “damn yellow compositae”.

    • Yes, I’ve heard them called damned yellow flowers by ranchers who hate all of them. Especially Bastard Cabbage because livestock don’t eat them,
      they take up space and are so invasive. They look pretty driving by fields, though.

      Thanks for reading the blog.
      Wanda

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