Southeast Texas Gardening

While attending the Texas Master Gardener Convention in Victoria, we visited the local Master Gardener’s demonstration garden.  Gardening in this region is polar opposite of gardening here in our neck of the woods.  The plants there tend to be tropical and they have arable soil while we have hard clay and rocks.  They must have weeds, but I didn’t see any.The garden is across from the airport and is located around a former officer’s club.  This part of the garden was constructed over a former olympic-sized pool, which had been filled with dirt.  The total size of the gardens is over an acre.

The contrast between shade and bright sunlight made photography difficult.

Some plants, like this Duranta (Duranta erecta), can be grown in our area, but it dies in the winter.  There, it lives all year.  This one was huge.

Great plant.

This plant was unfamiliar to me.  It’s Cestrum (Cestrum aurantiacum) which grows in zones 9 -11.  Really pretty but not a choice for me.

Henry Duelberg Sage seems to be a favorite all over the state.  It’s in the mealy cup or blue sage variety and is a perennial where we live.

Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea Fabagae) bushes are simply gorgeous.  Definitely a hot climate plant.  In spite of its beauty, the beans are toxic and can be a temptation to children.

If it would live here, I’d give it a try.

Could not find a sign identifying these flowers but couldn’t pass up this picture.

At first, I wondered what was wrong with this plant.  Then I saw the sign.  Curly Leaf Leopard Plant (Ligularia tussilaginea) likes the heat but needs a bit of shade.  Aptly named.

Crested Leopard Plant (Ligularia eristata)

Ligularia (Farfugium tussilaginea “Gigantea”) are surprisingly in the aster family and are commonly know as the ragwort flower.  They have yellow flowers that resemble asters but aren’t the toxic ragwort found in some fields.

Cute bench.

Never could find a label for these.  The flowers look like they’re mixed in with larger leafed plants.

Another unidentified flower.  The red ones were lovely.

I’m sure that this Hibiscus was a new addition in preparation for this event.  Whenever an association takes on the job of hosting a convention, that means two years of work: planning and executing everything.  Kudos to the Victoria Master Gardeners for pulling off a successful convention and for this beautiful garden.

The next post will show more of the garden.

“Today I’m going to clean the house.  Oh, look, a flower (or book, etc.)”  unknown

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