Flash in the Pan

Warm weather has awakened some plants with flowers and tree bud openings.

This unknown woody plant pops up each year in a flowerbed.  I don’t know what it is nor how it got here.  I don’t remember planting it, but I certainly could have.

Each year I cut it back to the ground after blooming because it is too close to a more desirable bush.  The roots are entangled with other bushes, so that’s my solution.

In a field near the house, I noticed this in full bloom.  At first, it looked like Bee Bush, but close up, the flowers didn’t look right.

Rather than a bush, it appears to be a colony of one trunk small trees.

Pretty, but fleeting, the blooms only lasted for a few days.  The bees enjoyed a feast for those few days.

In the fields. tiny flowers are not noticeable unless one looks down.

This is probably Ten-petal Anemone (Anemone berlandieri).  Its name commemorates  Juis Berlandier from Belgium.  He traveled Texas in the mid 1800s and created one of the earliest and most extensive collections of native plants.

A few Rain Lilies from the last rain don’t draw attention to themselves.  They are sweet little surprises.

In the yard, clusters of buds appear on a Rusty Blackhaw Verburnum (Viburnum rufidulum).  It’s an East Texas plant that grows along rivers.  I defied reason and wanted to prove that it can be grown here.  It’s an under story tree or bush.

So, yes, it has lived for about six years here in the wrong soil and circumstances, but it hasn’t produced the blue berries in the fall.  By the end of our hot summer, it’s gasping and looking incredible sad.

This shot in the rising sunlight shows the individual cute little flowers, which won’t be around in a few days.

With these flash-in-a-pan flowers that have a limited lifespan, it reminds me to enjoy every moment as it comes.

“Life is dessert – too brief to hurry.”  Ann Voskamp

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