Foe or Friend?

Weeds appear in every gardening space.  At least, I know they pop up here regularly.  Some are unwelcome guests.  Others, not at all.  The good thing is that you get to choose who stays and who goes.

This plant came up in a pot.  A gift from a bird probably.  Since I didn’t recognize it, I decided to wait and see how it developed.

Clusters of green berries eventually turned red.

Those opened into tiny pretty flowers.  So I turned to a friend to identify the plant.  It’s Poke, Pokeweed or Poke Salad (Phytolacca americana).  Flowers and fruits are toxic.  The leaves can be eaten but must be processed properly.

A little research reveals that they grow quite large.  So at the end of the summer, this one will be pulled up.  It’s actually quite pretty at this stage, but I don’t want it taking over.

After a really good rain (praise and thanksgiving for that), these Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes atamasca) appeared in the fields and yard.  Also known as Zephyr or Fairy Lily, they are native to the U.S.  Cultivated species with white, yellow or pink flowers are available for purchase.

Delicate pure white flowers dot the landscape for a few days as a reminder of the blessings of rain.

The tall flower in the center is Snow on the Mountain (Euphorbia marginata).

Pretty flowers grow at the top of the stems.  When the stems are broken, white sticky sap oozes out.

Unless these appear in a large vacant area, it’s best to allow only a few to grow because they form large colonies as they reseed.  Those colonies are lovely to see out in the pastures.

These unknown plants also multiple quickly but are easy to pull up.  The stems are skeletal looking with thin leaves.  Could be a wild aster.

This is a weed that I actually planted because a friend gave me seeds she had gathered in a field.  The seed pods are almost to open now.  Clammy Weed (Polanisia dodecandra) is also known as Dwarf Cleome.

Clammy Weed multiplies aggressively; the wind scatters the seed all over the yard, so they come up here and there and not in a large clump.  It would be easy to eradicate them completely.

So what is the difference between a weed and a wildflower?  Mostly, it’s which ones strike your fancy.  Some might seem pretty and desirable and others bothersome because they have sharp thorns on them, push out other plants, or are just ugly.  They all are somewhat aggressive.  That’s the only way they can survive in the wild.

Sometimes it seems like I spend all my time getting rid of the ones that are very undesirable.  So I remind myself to just enjoy the pretty ones.

“All gardeners need to know when to accept something wonderful and unexpected, taking no credit except for letting it be.”  Allen Lacy

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