Bluebonnet Bonanza

Because the Bluebonnet season is so short, any time a Texan sees a field of them, it’s an obligation to stop.  Usually, it’s necessary to turn around and find a safe place to park on the side of the highway.

This season is the time to beware of red tail lights in front of you because natives and tourists alike will come to a screeking halt and hop out for photographs.

As we were returning home yesterday from College Station, it was raining and the temperature dropping.  But I couldn’t resist tromping around in the mud to get a few shots.

There are actually four different varieties of Bluebonnets, but the Lupinus texensis is the one seen most often.  Dramatic sweeps in fields along the roadsides of Central Texas make an impressive sight.

A few Indian Paintbrushes were scattered around.  There are also several varieties of Castilleja.  Some have deeper color.  I don’t know which one this is.

Bastard Cabbage is an invasive that ranchers hate in their fields.  But the yellow made a nice contrast to the blue.

Bluebonnets like rocky, uncultivated soil and need good drainage.  That’s why they’re often seen like water flowing down a hillside.

The foliage of Bluebonnets show up nicely here.  Just as the winter is ending, these distinctive little leaves lie close to the ground before it’s bloom time.

The wind was whipping around chilling me to the bone.  Even close to the ground, it was pushing these Pink Primroses (Oenothera speciosa) sideways.

The wind blurred this, but it’s the only one near me where the inside of the flower was open.

Prairie Verbenas (Glandularia bipinnatifida) are also blooming.  They will last a long time, until late fall.  Loved by many because they survive the hot, dry summers.

A wet, misty day, but lovely.

“Life’s like bluebonnets in the spring.  We’re only here for a little while.  It’s beautiful and bitter sweet.”  Aaron Watson

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