Bulbs Blooming

Different varieties of Lilies brighten up a spring yard.

Three Crinum Lilies, planted a few years ago, have begun to reproduce.  With our blazing sun from spring through fall, they would melt in full sun.  So these are planted on the east side of the house which protects them from the harshest sun.

They do well in southern U.S. because they love heat and moisture.  Here we have heat, but extra water is needed.

“Ellen Bosanquet” Crinum Lily (Crinum “Ellen Bosanquet’) with its deep rose color is lovely.

Crinums have huge bulbs.

Kindly Light Daylilies (Hemerocallis ‘Kindly Light’) have also spread.  Like other daylilies, each bloom lasts for a day.  But these open early in the morning and truly last until the sun dips.

Although it is recommended that Kindly Lights should be protected during mid-day hours, these are in full sun most of the day.

Really like the spider shaped petals.

Crimson Pirate Daylily (Hemerocallis ‘Crimson Pirate’) has a striking deep burgundy color with golden highlights.

Very reliable bulb.

The tiny stones seen in the upper left of the picture are expanded shale, which is a wonderful amenity for clay soil.  It’s expensive but lasts forever.

Good old “Ditch Lilies” come back for the 11th spring.  What more can one ask for?

Pretty color and the foliage lasts until first frost.

These Daylilies were planted in two long flowerbed on opposite ends of the house.  One receives morning sun and one afternoon sun, and they perform equally well.  Such a hardy plant.  Love them.

If you haven’t tried bulbs, I think they deserve a chance.

“The one who follows the crowd will usually go no further than the crowd.  The one who walks alone is likely to find himself in places no one has ever been before.”             Albert Einstein

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