Valentines from the Garden

Valentine’s Day has a non-romantic past since it comes from the martyr of Saint Valentine on February 14 in AD 269.  In AD 496 a pope declared that day to be known as Saint Valentine’s Day to honor his death.

The origin of the shape of the heart used as a symbol to denote love and romance is hard to nail down.  It may have come from the shape of a pod of a plant or from Aristotle describing the heart as having three chambers with a small dent in the middle.

Leaves of Sweetheart Hoya ( Hoya kerrii Craib) shaped like hearts in front of a soft Artemisia plant.

 

Buried in snow twice this winter, these Pincushion flowers (Scabiosa caucasica) just keep on blooming.  We’re poised, like most of the country, for another winter blast of extremely low temperatures and maybe ice or snow.

So these plants as well as others, such as tender shoots from bulbs, will freeze again. Life is unpredictable, just like the weather.

Bright red “Strawberry Fields” Gomphrena.

Woodland Fern grows really well in the ground here in a mostly shady area.

Always on the lookout for stones naturally formed like hearts.

Hope your February is filled spending time with those you love.  The isolation makes it hard to achieve that.  But phone calls count.

Happy Valentine’s Day.

“I love you with all my belly.  I would say heart, but my belly is bigger.”  unknown