“Let There Be Light”

Have you ever thought about how important light is to living things?  For some reason, probably the fact that we live where the sunlight is so bright and strong, I’ve been pondering about how the correct amount of light is needed for each plant.

Indirect light is needed for many of my pot plants because direct sun burns them to a crisp.  The strong, thorny stems of Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii) make it look like it could survive out in the sun.  And it probably could in some areas, but not here.

The small flower clusters grow on a small stem at the end of the branches.  The flowers last for weeks.  Great to look at but handle carefully.  I use tongs to move any stems I cut off to propagate.

Some varieties of Coleus that have been developed in the last few years are purported to do well in full sun.  I’m just skeptical about that and put them in filtered light.

These are two of my favorite types of Coleus.  These both survived last winter in the shed, but the curly kind didn’t do as well as I had hoped.  One noted horticulturist says there is no need to overwinter some types of plants.  Just buy new ones in the spring.

My philosophy is that it’s worth it to try.  Then in the spring, buy other plants that I haven’t tried before.

Bouganvillea thrives in the heat and sun.  In fact, it seems that it takes forever to bloom in the summer.  I fertilize it and water it frequently so that it will bloom.  The bright, colorful blooms are gorgeous.

Eve’s Necklace (Sophora affinis) is a small ornamental tree that grows as an understory tree in the wild.  It’s native to Central Texas.  This one is about 6 years old and so far, it’s done well out in full sun.

The strings of seed pods that look like black pearls form in the summertime.

One morning I got really excited because it looked like rain.  Even a rainbow in the clouds indicated moisture.  But alas, the overcast sky was gone by late morning, and it proved to be another dry day.

Garlic Chives (Allium tuberosum)  is another late summer bloomer.  This area receives last morning filtered sun.

They are native to China but have naturalized in the US.  They are edible with a mild flavor.  They were given to me, but I haven’t eaten any.  Just like their looks.

Hooray.  The berries on the American Beauty Berry plant are starting to change color.  The berries will last until a hard freeze.

Thanks for reading and have a great day.

“Thoughtfulness is to a friendship what sunshine is to a garden.”  unknown