Queen for a Day

Okay, I’m showing my age, but does anyone remember hearing about the old TV show “Queen for a Day”?  It started in the late 1940’s as a radio show and became a popular daytime TV show in in the 50’s and early 60’s.

My mother and thousands of other ladies watched as women told sob stories to be chosen as queen and receive gifts like refrigerators.  The winner was crowned, draped with a red velvet robe and placed on a throne.  She reigned for a day.

In the garden, daylilies like “Elegant Candy” (Hemerocallis ‘Elegant Candy’) reign for a day in all their splendor.  In fact, the word Hemerocallis comes from two Greek words meaning beauty and day.

Many daylilies, like this “Early Snow” grow low to the ground with the flower raised on a stem about a foot tall.

The spider shape of “Frans Hals” grows on a taller stem.  Probably named after an artist during the Dutch Golden Age with most of the best work done during the 1600’s.  Frans Hals painted mostly portraits or groups of people.

The deep color of the center of “Inwood” grabs attention.

Hardy Hibiscus in the mallow family is truly stunning.  The tissue-papery flowers may last more than a day.  I haven’t determined that.

These hibiscus are winter hardy and relatively drought tolerant with huge flowers – 8″ across.  The branches do tend to flop, so stakes are necessary.  Sorry I don’t remember the color.

The dark color of “Passion for Red”  makes it a true beauty.

Rose Mallow ‘Luna Pink Swirl’ (Hibiscus moscheutos) is cold hardy to zone 5.  It’s a keeper and a beauty.  The flowers last one day with more buds waiting to open.

Another queen for a day (or night) is Moon Flower (Datura wrightii).  It’s a Texas native that needs shade with filtered light.

The blue flowers are Black and Blue Sage (Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’) in a pot in front of the Moon Flower.  This plant also needs semi-shade:  at least in the hot Texas sun.

“Scottish Fantasy”

“Viva la Vida” is double cross lily.  An Asiatic hybrid was crossed with a fragrant Oriental and then crossed back with another Asiatic lily.  This one doesn’t truly apply for queen for a day since its blooms last a few days.

Viva la Vida is Spanish for “Live that Life”.  There’s also a song by that name.

The last painting by Frida Kahlo in 1954 was named Viva la Vida.

I’m a big fan of bulbs, corm, and tubers like daylilies, irises, and crinums.  They’re a great investment that multiples over time.

“We might think that we are nurturing our garden, but of course, it’s our garden that is really nurturing us.”  Jenny Uglow