Glorious Autumn Days

Whenever perfect autumn days comes to mind, these recent days fit the bill.  The weather has been mild, the skies blue with some puffy clouds and some colorful flowers in the yard.

Duranta (Duranta erecta) flowers hang gracefully on long, draping branches.

Roses are still blooming, like this Princess Alexandra of Kent, with an especially large flower as a last hurrah.

Bushes are rejuvenated with flowers.  Bright orange flowers of Orange Globe Mallow (Sphaeralcea munroana) against the soft, curly leaves make a striking combination.

Pollinators have been buzzing around busily getting their fill.

All kinds of butterflies have been flitting from flower to flower.  Most are so fast, it’s hard to snap a pix.  But this Sulfur lingered on a Flame Acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus v. wrightii) blossom soaking up the sunshine and the nectar.

Purple flowers on a Blue Potato Bush (Lycianthes rantonnetii) and a few yellow Yarrows add some bright color.  The Blue Potato Bush is zone 8 – 11.  Mine is in a pot and was left out last winter and survived.

A little pop of red berries on a native vine glows in the late autumn sun.

What gems these days have been, so we savor them while they last.

“Life becomes more meaningful when you realize the simple fact that you’ll never get the same moment twice.”  unknown

Goodbye, Sweet Autumn

Winter snuck in overnight.  Or maybe we weren’t paying attention.  We both had what we thought was the flu and lots of outside chores were put on hold.  Turns out, we tested positive for covid.

At least, the predicted freezing sleet and icy roads did not happen.

One moment tropical Hibiscus was blooming and the next, everything had to be rushed into the greenhouse. So bundled up in a drizzling rain, we hustled to gather up what needed winter protection.

After we added soil to the pots and cleaned out some debris, African Bulbine did really well this year.  A South African native, it loves heat but is only cold hardy down to 20 degrees.

The roses have been a special treat this fall, blooming like crazy.  Princess Alexandra of Kent, a David Austin rose, has the sweetest aroma of any of my roses.  Plus, the form of the roses are spectacular.

Maggie Rose, which Dr. William Welch of A&M found in Louisiana, reblooms so often, it’s difficult to keep it deadheaded.

My all time favorite mum is Country Girl Mum.  With a totally different look from the more common Purple Aster, it lifts my heart every time I see it.

With its pink white large petals, it looks like a daisy in the fall.  It seems to originated in Texas, possibly as a seeding from another mum.  It’s definitely one for a home landscape.

“A mean thought is just a sin that happens on the inside.”                                            Lisa Wingate,  Never Say Never

Alluring Roses

Some people are hesitant to grow roses.  If I can grow roses, then anyone can.  Just like growing anything, there are a few things to consider:  selection, soil, and site.

The selection of which rose to grow is the first step.  Hardiness of the rose is determined by several factors.  Old  garden roses have proved the test of time.  If they’re still around, that’s proof that they did not die off from diseases or require high maintenance.

Old roses tend to have lots of green leaves, grow on their own roots, and are easy to propagate.  The bush in the above picture is an old rose that I cannot identify.  I propagated it from a small stem that was given to me.

A good source for old roses is Antique Rose Emporium in Independence, TX.  Their catalog is available, and they ship.

Earthkind Roses list is a great reliable source for hardy roses.

Found roses fall into the hardy category because they’re likely old roses.  This is Martha Gonzalez, which was discovered in Navasota, TX in 1984 growing in Martha’s yard.

Martha Gonzalez is a small bush that blooms over and over from spring until late fall.

This David Austin rose bush Alnwick shows why a rose growing on it’s own root is important.

Three years ago we planted the Martha Gonzalez bush and 100 feet away in another bed we planted this Alnwick Rose by David Austin.  Imagine my confusion recently when I discovered what looked Martha Gonzalez growing as part of the David Austin.

The green shoots are the red flowered branches and on the other side are brown branches with the David Austin.   I sent an email with pictures asking about this situation to Antique Rose Emporium.

Looking down into the bush, it’s easy to see that both types of roses are growing from the same root stock.

Antique Rose Emporium generously answered my questions.  These red roses are not Martha Gonzalez, but Dr. Huey roses, which is often used as a root stock for grafting.

So, bottom line, roses grown on own root stock are best.

Double Delight is one of my favorites.  It is a multiple award winner and is a cross of two hybrid tea roses.  The aroma is what gets me.

It’s easy to achieve the right soil needed, if a raised bed is used.  Roses don’t require perfect soil, but also can’t tolerate extremes, like heavy clay.  Amending with compost helps loosen the soil.  David Austin’s Princess Alexandra of Kent rose was named after a cousin of Queen Elizabeth.  It’s a shrub rose that spreads out rather than upward.  It was planted last year, so time will tell how it performs.  Has a nice aroma.

All roses need full sun, which means at least six hours a day.  Living Easy Apricot-Orange rose grows on own root.  Its color is stunning.

Another site concern is cold hardiness zones.  It’s important to know your zone where you live.  Like any plant, check the zone before you buy.

Rainbow’s End Rose is a miniature bush that is about 18 inches tall.  The flowers first bloom yellow with red edges and then turn red as they age.  So, both red and yellow flowers on the bush make it a show stopper.

Although I truly believe that hardy old rosebushes and earthkind roses are the best choices, sometimes I get intrigued by the unusual.  Sentimental is a floribunda with striped red and white blooms and a strong scent.  It was bred in the US and came on the market in 1997.

This blog is way longer than usual, but I’m passionate about roses.  At least, I didn’t show all my bushes and didn’t attempt to talk about different categories of roses.

I appreciate anyone who reads my blog.  Thank you for your time.

“Laughter is the shock absorber that eases the blows of life.”  unknown