Bird Island

Bird Island in Pebble Beach can be viewed from a rocky beach near a parking area.

The island itself looks like solid rock covered in bird guano.  From the shore it’s difficult to distinguish the birds.

Zoom lens reveals individual birds.

Most of birds are cormorants, which feed on sea fish.  Their feathers allow their wings to become saturated so they can dive deep.  On the rock they can be seen with their wings open to dry thme.

Years ago we saw cormorants used by Chinese fishermen.  A string was tied around their neck so they could not swallow.  The fishermen would push one off a small boat and pull them back on to remove the fish the bird had caught in his beak.

Another island a little further out provides a resting spot for sea lions.

Walking down to the sandy beach, a path led us through lots of native vegetation.  The roots holds the soil in place.

The pinkish flowers look cotton candy.

The ground was hard packed, so walking was easy without sinking into the sand.

The constant movement of the ocean could be seen as waves washed up on the rocks.

Small shells were scattered on the sand.

A nice quiet time on the beach before the crowds arrived.

This will be the last post from our time in California.

“…recognize and respect Earth’s beautiful systems of balance, between the presence of animals on land, the fish in the sea, birds in the air, mankind, water, air, and land.  Most importantly there must always be awareness of the actions by people that can disturb this precious balance.”            Margaret Meade

Carmel Valley

Expectations are often disappointed.  We were prepared for mild mid 70’s weather in Carmel.  In reality, it was mostly mid to low 60’s.  Too chilly for us coming from high 90’s.  So we were pleased one day to drive into the valley away from the sea.

The green rolling hills and farms of the valley were a breathe of fresh air away from the crowded area of all the towns bunched around Carmel.

Although we saw these plants on tall stems growing everywhere, no one was able to identify them.  Notice that the hen and chick looking head was green, black,

or red.  Does anyone know their name?

The other plant that I loved were these hibiscus looking flowers on tall stems.

The warmer valley could have been mistaken for parts of New Mexico.

A wide diversity of cacti and succulents added interest to the small town.

A long planting of Lavender and the light purple flowers of Agapanthus or Lily of the Valley on the other side of the fence complemented each other nicely.  They seemed to be thriving all over the areas we visited because of the mild winters.

Don’t know why this fence fascinated me.  No one else seemed interested.

Great plant holder in a boutique/antique store.

This little lady welcomed all the shoppers.

Finally, part of this ubiquitous plant’s flowering color had not faded yet.  Even past its blooming time, it’s an interesting plant.

Loved the open spaces and warmth of the valley.  Just a country girl at heart.

“Social and media should not be used together because it becomes an oxymoron.”  unknown

Carmel by the Sea

The Carmel coastline is rocky with a few sandy beaches.

On one side of a narrow street that follows the curves of the coast are homes.  The lot sizes are small because the land is so costly.  Behind the houses lining the street are other houses built up higher behind them to get an ocean view.

The tiny front yards are designed to give the most bang for their space.

Parking is along the street, so it’s necessary to walk a long way to get to certain destinations.

Closer to the town, a Stanford University marine trial station is on the beach side on a large lot.  Near there was this humongous Bottle Brush bush.

The “brushes” don’t look exactly the same as the ones sold in Texas.  Stunning, aren’t they?

Another bush along this same stretch of land is this stunner.  It was planted several places in town, so it may or may not be a native.

A long swatch of this is probably a native.  This is further from the edge of the shopping areas and seemed to be growing wild.

A chain link fence serves as a barrier to the beach.

On the Stanford University property, we could see sea lions resting on a small sandy beach.

Ice Plant is evidently a good soil erosion prevention plant.  Very few flowers were open, so it must not be their blooming season, or we just missed it.

Then came a walking path along the sea with a low rock fence.

This most unusual looking house sits on a less developed area of the inland side of the road.  What is that patchwork roof made of?  Crazy.

Lovers point is our destination.

Lots of these striking plants all over this area of California.

The water was choppy but paddle boarders, canoers, and surfers enjoyed the 4th of July in the water.  Just hoped they were experienced and knew how to miss the rocks.

The actual point of Lover’s Point has a large pile of rocks.

There are restrooms, a children’s play area, and a restaurant.  Love these hybrid daises.

The underside of the petals are a light purple.

Some of the chubbiest squirrels I’ve ever seen.  Don’t know what the tourists are feeding them.  Lots of different languages could be hear.

The roots of small native plants were tucked under the rocks.  Extremely hardy to endure the environment and the foot traffic.

Since I’ve seen lots of rock piles in Texas, not sure what the draw was.  But here we were.

Couldn’t get acclimated to the cold weather.  But enjoyed the sights.

“Either you decide to stay in the shallow end of the pool or you go out in the ocean.”  Christopher Reeve