Alluring Roses

Some people are hesitant to grow roses.  If I can grow roses, then anyone can.  Just like growing anything, there are a few things to consider:  selection, soil, and site.

The selection of which rose to grow is the first step.  Hardiness of the rose is determined by several factors.  Old  garden roses have proved the test of time.  If they’re still around, that’s proof that they did not die off from diseases or require high maintenance.

Old roses tend to have lots of green leaves, grow on their own roots, and are easy to propagate.  The bush in the above picture is an old rose that I cannot identify.  I propagated it from a small stem that was given to me.

A good source for old roses is Antique Rose Emporium in Independence, TX.  Their catalog is available, and they ship.

Earthkind Roses list is a great reliable source for hardy roses.

Found roses fall into the hardy category because they’re likely old roses.  This is Martha Gonzalez, which was discovered in Navasota, TX in 1984 growing in Martha’s yard.

Martha Gonzalez is a small bush that blooms over and over from spring until late fall.

This David Austin rose bush Alnwick shows why a rose growing on it’s own root is important.

Three years ago we planted the Martha Gonzalez bush and 100 feet away in another bed we planted this Alnwick Rose by David Austin.  Imagine my confusion recently when I discovered what looked Martha Gonzalez growing as part of the David Austin.

The green shoots are the red flowered branches and on the other side are brown branches with the David Austin.   I sent an email with pictures asking about this situation to Antique Rose Emporium.

Looking down into the bush, it’s easy to see that both types of roses are growing from the same root stock.

Antique Rose Emporium generously answered my questions.  These red roses are not Martha Gonzalez, but Dr. Huey roses, which is often used as a root stock for grafting.

So, bottom line, roses grown on own root stock are best.

Double Delight is one of my favorites.  It is a multiple award winner and is a cross of two hybrid tea roses.  The aroma is what gets me.

It’s easy to achieve the right soil needed, if a raised bed is used.  Roses don’t require perfect soil, but also can’t tolerate extremes, like heavy clay.  Amending with compost helps loosen the soil.  David Austin’s Princess Alexandra of Kent rose was named after a cousin of Queen Elizabeth.  It’s a shrub rose that spreads out rather than upward.  It was planted last year, so time will tell how it performs.  Has a nice aroma.

All roses need full sun, which means at least six hours a day.  Living Easy Apricot-Orange rose grows on own root.  Its color is stunning.

Another site concern is cold hardiness zones.  It’s important to know your zone where you live.  Like any plant, check the zone before you buy.

Rainbow’s End Rose is a miniature bush that is about 18 inches tall.  The flowers first bloom yellow with red edges and then turn red as they age.  So, both red and yellow flowers on the bush make it a show stopper.

Although I truly believe that hardy old rosebushes and earthkind roses are the best choices, sometimes I get intrigued by the unusual.  Sentimental is a floribunda with striped red and white blooms and a strong scent.  It was bred in the US and came on the market in 1997.

This blog is way longer than usual, but I’m passionate about roses.  At least, I didn’t show all my bushes and didn’t attempt to talk about different categories of roses.

I appreciate anyone who reads my blog.  Thank you for your time.

“Laughter is the shock absorber that eases the blows of life.”  unknown

Good-bye to Spring

As an unusually long, cool, wet spring comes to an end, we’re all counting our blessings.  This wonderful weather has been wide spread and a real treat.  It’s near the end of June and no really hot temperatures.  Hooray.It’s sad to say good bye to the spectacular show of Shasta Daisies (Leucanthemum x superbum.)

Daisies are one of my favorite flowers.  Emphasis on the word “one”.  A Painted Lady is enjoying a flat landing spot.

Many gorgeous spirals on the Vitex or Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus) has brought a sweet fragrance to the back yard.

In the front yard, another Vitex, but it almost seems like a different species.  The blossoms are smaller, a paler color, and not scented.  In front of the Vitex are some Flame Acanthus, which just keep spreading.

In late fall, I cut both Vitex back severely to keep them from becoming large trees because those are not nearly as attractive.

This flowerbed is anchored by the Vitex and a large Desert False Indigo (Amorpha fruticosa). Between the large bush/trees are Cone Flowers and Rock Roses by the sidewalk.

Behind the Cone flowers is a Bridal Wreath Spiraea, a small Crepe Myrtle, and some Mexican Feather Grass.  So this bed is crammed full.

Cone Flowers (Echinacea purpurea) are also waning, although some will hang on through the summer.

Another absolute favorite.

The Mexican Feather Grass (Nassella or Stipa tenuissima) hasn’t totally greened up yet.  This is considered to be invasive but that hasn’t happened in this bed.

The ground cover around the Vitex is Stonecrop Sedum.  It helps keep the native grass out of this bed.

This year I’ve planted Potato Bush (Lycianthes rantonnetti) in a pot so it can be carried inside in winter.  One year I tried it in a flower bed; that winter was particulary harsh and killed it.

The flowers have a similar look as Mexican Petunia.

After the initial first flush, the roses are just now starting to bloom again.  Abraham Darby has David Austin’s trademark inner petals.

A new rose that intrigues me is Scentimental.  It was hybridized by Tom Carruth.

He has created more roses than any other living American.

It’s also called a red and white stripped rose.  So far, I haven’t noticed that the smell is that strong, but still love the uniqueness of it.

“Happiness depends more upon the internal frame of a person’s own mind than on the externals in the world.”  George Washington