Early Blooms

Each day this time of the year brings unexpected weather.  It can be overcast and cold or sunny and warm.  On the warm days, it’s time to work outside pruning or planting.  I have several inside projects that I’m trying to finish on the colder days.

But as blooms keep popping up each day, I long to be outside every day.

Old fashioned heirloom Irises are blooming in the field across the driveway.  Most of these bulbs were given to me by friends and have performed for years and years.  Old Homestead Irises is another name for them.

They’re so hardly that they grow right along with the weeds and cacti.  I’ve dug up several cacti in this area, but they keep coming back.  These pass-a-long Irises don’t need much water and no attention.

This Rusty Blackhaw Verbiurum (Viburnum rufidulum) is more persnickety.  It requires some early morning light and afternoon shade.  It prefers to grow along water streams and edges of wooded areas.  So I’m pushing the envelope to even have it where I live.

It was first planted in a sunny spot, where it barely survived for two summers.  Then it was moved and seems happy here.

After several years in this more protected site, it’s finally producing some clusters of lovely white flowers.

Miniature Indian Hawthorn (Rhaphiolepsis indica) loves the sun and blooms in early spring.  It maintains a nice, rounded shape naturally.

It’s a nice accent plant or in groups.

And now, my favorite perennial shrub this time of the year:  Bridal Wreath Spirea is the pièce de résistance.

The arched branches are literally dripping with clusters of flowers.

It just doesn’t get lovelier or more romantic than this spring time beauty.

In spite of the unusual circumstances of social distancing, flowers still bring beauty to the earth.  Enjoy them.

“Where flowers bloom, so does hope.”  Lady Bird Johnson

Friends Return

Maybe it’s just me, but when perennials bloom each spring, it feels like old friends have dropped in for a visit.

Now I have to admit that these Four Nerve Daisies (Tetraneuris scaposa) have stayed around all winter, since it was especially mild.  But now they look brighter and perkier, ready to face the coming summer.

Each spring I’m still surprised that Amaryllis return.  In my mind, they belong in the inside potted plant category.  But I must give them credit showing up again the third time.  These were all gifts from my mother during her last two Christmases.

Such a beautiful, double flower with amazing bright color.

It seems I don’t notice some weeds until I see their pictures on the big screen of a computer.

This poor dwarf Indian Hawthorn is still struggling to recover from a really harsh winter before this last one.

But the flowers are sweet.

As always, I love my re-blooming Irises.

This Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) bloomed really early before cold days were over.  It’s hardiness is one of its best features, besides the lovely hanging flowers.

The Square Bud Primrose (Onagraceae Calylophus drummondianus)  isn’t as full as it used to be.  Maybe it’s still early.  It’s a Texas native, so I expect it to recover.

Dianthus is back with a flourish.  I like the red and pink on each petal.

Some visitors outstay their welcome.  The Texas Flowering Quince is just about to be pushed out the door because it needs to be pruned soon and tidied up.

Bluebonnets are always welcome.  Just planted this one, so I hope it makes it.  It’s leaning over Stonecrop Sedum.

The pinkish lavender against the beautiful deep purple makes a stunning show.

Welcome, old friends.  Stay awhile.

“A real friend is one who walks in when the rest of the world walks out.”  unknown

More Ice Pix

Everything looks picture worthy as I tramp around the ice covered yard.

Ice gives Yaupon Holly a sparkle.

Brr.  No one wants to live here in this cold.

Snapping off of the frozen branches from the Texas Kidneywood bush would be easy.

Possum Haw berries in a globe of ice.  Possumhaw Holly is a great small native tree with multiple trunks.

Icy Red Yucca branches under an overcast sky makes me shiver.

The two preceding pictures show Blue Mistflowers.

At the tip of tall trunks of Desert False Indigo (Amorpha fruticosa), heavy ice keeps the branches from swaying in the wind.

Ice covered rose bushes have an ethereal look.

Spaghetti strands of Dried Mexican Feather Grass flops on the ground.

Dwarf Indian Hawthorn is one of the few evergreen bushes in our yard.  The frosty ice coating is gorgeous.

Tall, thin stems of Obedient Plant form upside down icicles.

Bright red Rose Hip with copper colored Rose leaves provides color in a drab wintry scene.

I enjoy some winter when the harsh weather only comes a few days at a time.  But basically, I’m a warm weather person.

“If winter comes, can spring be far behind?”  Percy Bysshe Shelley