What Happened to Autumn?

The middle of October was still in the throes of summer.  Here we are on the last day of October.  Last night was a hard freeze.  So all those jobs that we postponed because it was too hot and had planned to do in autumn, probably won’t get done this year.

Today the sun is shining.  Apparently, the freeze didn’t kill anything.

Autumn Purple Asters are in bloom.  These were divided a few years ago.  It looks like that task needs to be repeated.

Pretty little fellows.

Last spring I planted a couple of Country Girl Mums (Chrysanthemum ‘County Girl’).  They got so tall that they flopped over.  So this coming year, I plan to trim them back a bit in the summer.

But aren’t they gorgeous?  They have full pedals, like daisies.

Not readily available in box stores.  Look for them in a local, privately owned nursery.

Strawberry Fields Gomphrena (Globe Amaranth) is also difficult to find.  But well worth the search.  They reseed beautifully.

The spots on this Cannova Yellow Canna Lily from Monrovia makes it a little different from the usual canna lily.Good old dependable Belinda’s Dream survived the summer well and produced another flurry of blooms when the weather cooled just a tad.

This unknown native showed up a couple of years ago in a flowerbed.  They’re easy to pull up, so it’s not a problem when they pop up.  I pull some and leave some because they fill in some bare spots once the Purple Coneflowers and Daisies give up the ghost in the relentless heat of summer.

I’ve looked in my native flower books to identify them.  So far, no luck.

Three new Smoke Bushes (Cotinus coggygria) made it through the summer.  Maybe next year they will bloom with smokey plumes in the fall.  Thankfully, they are drought tolerant.

I think this is a Gomphrena globosa, commonly known as globe amaranth.  It grows differently than the Strawberry Gomphrena because they are individual plants.  This one is a short rounded shrub.

This is a rose that I propagated, so I don’t know which one it is.  I propagate several different kinds of roses at the same time.  They are labeled at first.  When they get transplanted, my labeling system breaks down.  Need to work on that.

Gregg’s Blue Mist Flower (Conoclinium greggii) is still blooming and attracting some butterflies.

If the cold weather continues, all these beauties will die and reappear next spring.

The next blog will show a few more flowers that are hanging on.

“Don’t let the world convince you that trusting is for fools and forgiving is for the weak.  These gifts are blessings given to you that prove that you have an amazing capacity to love and that you have goodness in your heart.” Brigitte Nicole

Rose Emporium Visit

Back in Brenham at the Antique Rose Emporium, there’s lots to see.

Nice bouquet of roses and Celosia in the seminar meeting room.

On the grounds, there are plenty of flowers to enjoy, like this Country Girl Mum (Dendranthema zawadskii).  They are heirlooms from Russia that bloom in the fall and are spreaders.

A Queen butterfly loves it, too.

The Rose Emporium abounds with many decorating ideas for the yard.

Candle bush or candlestick cassia (Cassia alata), becomes a small tree or large bush.
Pollinators are drawn to the bright yellow blossoms, but it needs warm winters.

Wonder if this structure was originally a keyhole garden.

This bloom was way above my head.  It looks like a Datura or Moon Flower.  Datura stramonium is commonly called Jimson weed, Stink weed, Loco Weed, Thorn Apple, Angel’s Trumpet, Devil’s Trumpet, Devil’s Snare, Devil’s See, Mad Hatter, etc.

Most of these names are the result of the fact that the plant is poisonous and have huge seed pods that are so prickly you can’t handle them.  But when they fall to the ground and decay, the small black seeds fall out and propagate new plants.

To me, the flowers justify growing them.

Cosmos can be used to fill any barren spot in the garden.  They will quickly fill the space.

A small rose, Lynn’s Legacy, spoke to me.  I like the cupped shape of the petals.  Also, that it can be grown in a pot.

Dahlias has always been a flower for the northern United States in my mind because they don’t seem suited for our heat.  So, I was surprised to see one growing there.

That area has better soil than we do.  I don’t know if Dahlias have a chance in our caliche clay soil and extreme heat.

Very pretty and tempting.

Porterweed has attracted a Gulf Fritillary.

At the back of the meeting room, small vases of heritage roses were displayed.  One of the main characteristics of heirloom roses, besides being hardy, is the scent.  So this was a chance to smell them and be enticed to buy some bushes.

Very Texas rose display.

It was a great couple of days to hear wonderful, knowledgeable speakers that came from long distances and to enjoy the gardens.

“I say, if your knees aren’t green by the end of the day, you ought to seriously re-examine your life.”  Bill Watterson, Calvin & Hobbes