Native and Adapted Plants

Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center and Texas A&M Extension Agents have been on a mission for years.  They have been preaching about the benefits of native plants.  They also add that many plants have adapted well to our climate.

Native plants are winter hardy, evergreen, or spread seeds.  So that means they survive to grow and bloom in season.  Native also means that it grows naturally in your area.  However, many natives that are not in your immediate vicinity do well in your climate.

Texas Bluebells (Eustoma exaltatum) can be seen occasionally in our pastures.  But they are much more prolific further south.  But they survive our winters.

These look like tulips, but they open up more later in the morning.

Both of these plants were bought at the same time, but one flower is a deeper purple than the other one.  I’ve had both of these for several years.  Their seeds have not produced other plants.  Mystery.

There are vastly different regions in Texas.  Rainfall varies from 54 inches annual average in the east to 10 inches in the west.  Soils range from acidic to alkaline and from sand to clay to caliche to loam.  Winter temperatures, plus rainfall, and soils make native plants area specific.  Sometimes, I try to stretch it, but end up having too many pot plants to carry inside.

Clammy Weed (Polanisia dudecandra) is one of those natives that pops up all over the yard.

A friend gave me seeds years ago.

Turk’s Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus) spreads by underground rhizomes, but it’s fairly slow.  This has been here 10 or more years.

It’s surprising how well this thin leafed plant does in full sun or shade.

Love the turban flowers.

Iron Weed ((Veronia baldwinii fasciculata) seeds were given to me about 5 years ago.  So it also spreads slowly.

The blooms don’t last a long time.  They do grow in the ditches not too far away.

Sages are great performers in our area.  I have a flower bed full of Henry Duelburg Salvia or Mealycup Sage (Saliva farinacea).  The wind blew some seeds into a field nearby, so I dug them up and put them in several pots.  Some were taken to a club plant sale.

Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is a Texas native.  However, the ones I’ve noticed around here are not as large as the ones I have bought.  Pollinators love this plant.

Passion Vine is also a Texas native.  Don’t think they grow naturally in our area but are well-adapted.

It actually has a tropical look.

Gregg’ Mistflower, more commonly known as Blue Mistflower, (Conoclinium greggii) is a Texas native that grows gangbusters here.  To the left is Mexican Petunia that is so well adapted that it’s invasive.

One of the best plants to attract butterflies is Bluemist Flower.

There are many, many more Texas natives that do well in a home landscape.  If chosen carefully, they can be successful and bring beauty to the yard.

”When you rise in the morning, give thanks for the light, for your life, for your strength. Give thanks for your food and for the joy of living. If you see no reason to give thanks, the fault lies in yourself.”  Chief Tecumseh

Foe or Friend?

Weeds appear in every gardening space.  At least, I know they pop up here regularly.  Some are unwelcome guests.  Others, not at all.  The good thing is that you get to choose who stays and who goes.

This plant came up in a pot.  A gift from a bird probably.  Since I didn’t recognize it, I decided to wait and see how it developed.

Clusters of green berries eventually turned red.

Those opened into tiny pretty flowers.  So I turned to a friend to identify the plant.  It’s Poke, Pokeweed or Poke Salad (Phytolacca americana).  Flowers and fruits are toxic.  The leaves can be eaten but must be processed properly.

A little research reveals that they grow quite large.  So at the end of the summer, this one will be pulled up.  It’s actually quite pretty at this stage, but I don’t want it taking over.

After a really good rain (praise and thanksgiving for that), these Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes atamasca) appeared in the fields and yard.  Also known as Zephyr or Fairy Lily, they are native to the U.S.  Cultivated species with white, yellow or pink flowers are available for purchase.

Delicate pure white flowers dot the landscape for a few days as a reminder of the blessings of rain.

The tall flower in the center is Snow on the Mountain (Euphorbia marginata).

Pretty flowers grow at the top of the stems.  When the stems are broken, white sticky sap oozes out.

Unless these appear in a large vacant area, it’s best to allow only a few to grow because they form large colonies as they reseed.  Those colonies are lovely to see out in the pastures.

These unknown plants also multiple quickly but are easy to pull up.  The stems are skeletal looking with thin leaves.  Could be a wild aster.

This is a weed that I actually planted because a friend gave me seeds she had gathered in a field.  The seed pods are almost to open now.  Clammy Weed (Polanisia dodecandra) is also known as Dwarf Cleome.

Clammy Weed multiplies aggressively; the wind scatters the seed all over the yard, so they come up here and there and not in a large clump.  It would be easy to eradicate them completely.

So what is the difference between a weed and a wildflower?  Mostly, it’s which ones strike your fancy.  Some might seem pretty and desirable and others bothersome because they have sharp thorns on them, push out other plants, or are just ugly.  They all are somewhat aggressive.  That’s the only way they can survive in the wild.

Sometimes it seems like I spend all my time getting rid of the ones that are very undesirable.  So I remind myself to just enjoy the pretty ones.

“All gardeners need to know when to accept something wonderful and unexpected, taking no credit except for letting it be.”  Allen Lacy