Visit Chandor Gardens

Another look at what Chandor Gardens has to offer.

There are surprises along the pathways and stairs that climb to different levels of the garden.

Some of the newer structures don’t exactly fit in with the more formal sections, but are unique.

For the waterfall, the original builder and owner, Douglas Chandor, had to haul in soil and large rocks.  This was done without large equipment and one helper.

Pentas were in bloom and placed in several places in the garden.  They didn’t show any wilting from the heat but were fresh and lovely.

Maybe Bleeding Heart but don’t know for sure.

Stepping stones across a shallow pool.

Tied Bamboo poles give the illusion of sails on a small Chinese sampan boat.

Chinese statuary in different spots all around the garden makes me wonder why Chandor was so taken with that culture.

Chinese Button Bush (Adina Ruella) looks a little like the North American Button Bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis).  But it’s parts are more distinct and pop out against dark foliage.  This was in a mostly shady area on the edge of a small stream.

Chandor’s home is used for special events.

This Magnolia looks healthy, even in the extreme dry heat.

One of the many water features, this Pixie Pond is another place to relax and enjoy the sound and sight of water.

Cast stone pixies in different poses are placed on top of the stone (or brick) edges around the pond.  Chandor chose them and placed them himself, probably in the late 40’s.

The next post will be the final one on Chandor Gardens.

“We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.”  Thomas Fuller

Hearts and Flowers

From store decorations to school parties, nothing says Valentine’s Day like hearts and flowers.  And, I must not forget glorious chocolate.

Felder Rushing is a prolific author with about 44 gardening books published.  This one is a small picture book ideal for an end table or coffee table.  For each heart picture, there is a quote.

He is a creative guy who definitely takes some unique pictures.  The theme is about hearts that can be seen on a walk outside.  There’s no plant information or garden designs, just hearts.

Anthurium plant (Anthurium andraeanum) is among the best-known tropical flowers.  Found in Hawaii and other Pacific islands.

“There is nothing in a caterpillar that tells you it’s going to be a butterfly.”                   Hans Christian Anderson

Bleeding Hearts (Lamprocapnos spectabilis) is native to Siberia, northern China, Korea, and Japan.  Maybe it can be grown in northern USA, or as a pampered container plant in some environments, but here, it’s a picture book flower.

“People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.”  Iris Murdoch

This little book inspired me to look in my own environment for hearts.  Wrought iron furniture has lots of hearts, if you use your imagination.

Sweetheart Hoya or Valentine Hoya’s (Hoya kerrii) perfect green hearts fit the bill.  It’s a succulent with thick leaves and will bloom in the right conditions.  They need filtered light, water when soil is dry, and 65 – 80 degrees.  But mine lives outside in the shade during the hot summer and is brought in during the winter.

Heart on a wrought iron bench.An old picture shows a stone heart in our creek.

Have fun looking for your own hearts.  Happy Valentine’s Day.

“Love is a game that two can play and both win.”  Eva Gabor