Veggies and Other Goodies

At the Dallas Arboretum, we strolled through their new vegetable garden area and continued through all the gardens.

This is Mustard “Garnet Giant” (Brassica juncea).  The veggie plots were raised beds about 6′ x 6′.  Very neat and tidy.  No surprise there.

Everything looked so healthy, like this Cabbage “Ruby  Perfection” (Brassica oleracea).  The mulch throughout all the gardens are crushed pecan shells.  They obviously have a contract with a pecan shelling company.  Wish I knew a source.

Bronze Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

Confession:  I don’t personally grow vegetables but certainly appreciate the work involved and the results.

Around the vegetable beds are plots of low growing flowers.

Looking from that area is this lovely view of White Rock Lake.

Heading into a shadier area is a plot of ‘Marvel’ Mahonia.  I’ve seen these in other public gardens but have never seen them in bloom in the fall.

Chinese Fringe Flower ‘Purple Pixie’ (Loropetalum chinese) are decked out in their spring garbs ready for the Easter Parade.

Every time I see these in bloom, I think about buying one.  But, their cold hardiness is just at the edge of our zone.  Plus, I did try a couple of dwarf ones and they froze the first winter.  Still, sigh, they are so striking.

The Arboretum has many peaceful places like this small little stream.

These delicate white flowers look like Lily of the Valley flowers.

This tall urn sat on a concrete column, so it was above our head.

Lots of new things have been constructed since our last visit.

This was unique.  Wonder if they plan to put in Koi?

Lamb’s Ears (Stachys byzantina), with its soft, fuzzy leaves, just begs to be touched.

Forsythia ‘Spectabils’ (Forsythis x intermedia) is spectacular, especially in a mass planting.

One of the many things this public garden does well is to provide many small peaceful vinegettes.  They also have lots of benches where one can rest a spell.

These ornamental cabbages are so pretty with their frilly, lace leaves.

Edibles and non-edibles abound in this wonderful garden.  Hope you have a place to amble along a wandering path and savor nature.  Have a wonderful spring.

“The journey is the destination.”  Dan Eldon

Cafe at the Ridge Garden Vignettes

Our Master Gardeners Club took a day trip last week to the Kerrville area.  Our first stop was Café at the Ridge outside of town.  Originally it was called Roadkill Cafe.  About 12 years ago a new owner renovated it and put in a bakery, a garden, a nursery, and a gift shop.

Immediately I knew I would love this place.

Usually, whiskey barrels are cut in half for a flower pot.  This arrangement of three different ways to use the barrels make them much more unique.

Behind the railing is the porch area for the cafe.  We ate a delicious lunch there.

The wood is mesquite, which is expensive because it takes a long time for trunks to get large.

The pot on the left contains a Hardy Hibiscus.  Behind that is Dusty Miller with its lacy gray leaves.  On the right are some Daylilies and mystery yellow flowers.

This picture is to show the use of a broken pot.  In the center, surrounded by Begonias is a large pot that has parts of the pot stuck in the remaining large section.  There is also a bright blue pot placed inside.

Even though I like yard art, I don’t care for the hanging sunflower circles.

Another reconstructed clay pot contains plants and a fairy garden.

Unusual.

Lots of brightly colored pots for sale.

The theme of the garden seemed to be:  use as many unique items as flower pots as possible.  Here, old chest drawers were attached to legs and hold Foxtail Fern, Woodland Fern, and Begonias.  Not sure about the dark leafed plant.

A concrete basket contains Dusty Miller, Pentas, and maybe Penstemon.

A seesaw for adults

I’m always on the look out for old metal cars.  So far, no luck or they are too costly.

The round plaque would be nicer if it were more legible.

I actually have an old enamel pot that I need to drill holes in so it can be a planter.

The plant in the large pot looks like a Mexican Flame Vine (Pseudogynosux chenpodiodes) and the purple leafed one behind it is Princess Caroline Napier Grass, which is a Texas Super Star plant.

Because the Mexican Flame Vine is zone 9 -10, I have to move it into the shed for winter.  I bought it at a garden club sale in Waco but didn’t realize it was too tropical for here.  But it is beautiful.

Even old tires can become planters.  Not sure how they folded the tire back after cutting the zigzags.

A word about yard art.  This place has an overabundance of it.  But they are selling plants, pots, yard art, and suggesting ways to use plants.

The “tea and brie” set look down their noses at yard art.  But it can be used effectively.  First, one should see and enjoy the plants.  Then, wandering through the garden, one should encounter pleasant surprises that makes one smile, such as yard art.

In the city, that can be more challenging because of yard space, and because  some community rules prevent it.  But enjoy it when you can.

Lamb’s Ear in front.  The bedstead in the back has been turned into a plant protector.  In the center is a wire grid tepee that can be covered with plastic to shade plants from the sun.

Note the posts for this porch – cages filled with chunks of glass.

This picture was taken to show the Bottle Tree.  Haven’t seen one with that shaped frame.

I was enamored with this place, so lots of pictures.  Next post will continue with more from this nursery.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save