Spring Blooms

Spring isn’t here in my mind until the first flowers appear.  Then I get excited.

There are several types of iris.  Flag Iris (Iris versicolor) is considered a boggy land iris.  How I ended up with them, I can’t remember.  But they have come back for a couple of years in our dry climate.

Their form is different from the more familiar Bearded Iris.  The word Iris comes from the Greek word for rainbow, which is appropriate since there are so many different flower colors in the Iris family.

The Texas Scarlett Quince (Chaenomeles japonica ‘Texas Scarlett), starts to bloom when the weather is still cold.  The earlier blooms are now fading but the newer ones are deep red.

This is the very first sign of flowers on my Rusty Blackhaw Viburnum (Viburnum rufidulum) in five years old.  It was first planted in a full sun area, so two years ago, we moved it to a shadier spot.  Then it started to keep its green leaves through the summer.  Hurray.

Actually, someone told me they were difficult to grow in this area of Texas.  So, I took that as a challenge.

Spiderworts (Tradescantia Giantea) are blooming.  This first one was low to the ground but they’re atop tall stems now.

The foliage on Canyon Creek Abelia (Abelia grandiflora ‘Canyon Creek’) is yellow early in the spring but will darken to a copper color later.

A couple of pots of Dianthus made it through the winter fine.  They both came from my mother’s fenced backyard.  It gets really cold in Snyder, but there was protection away from the wind.  So I wasn’t sure they would survive the super cold winter on our windy hill.

Really like the gradation of these colors.

Bridal Wreath Spirea is showing off again.

Just doesn’t get any better than this.

Male Chinapin Oak with long, yellow catkins hanging before its leaves form.  Pollen from these flowers are carried by the wind to pollinate the flowers on the female trees.

The hanging yellow pollen flowers are pretty but a problem for people with allergies.

Dwarf Indian Hawthorne has pretty little flowers.  The one we planted last year got some freeze damage from our unusually cold winter.  Hopefully, it will fully recover.  We planted two others this year because we liked their look.

Earlier this spring I put out three Amaryllis that have been in pots for three years.  Christmas gifts that keep on giving.

This one has bloomed in a new flowerbed.  Other shrubs around it haven’t yet gotten big enough to protect it from the wind and hot western sun, so the blossoms may not last long.

Because of several different circumstances, I haven’t done much flowerbed weeding, yet.  But that’s not stopping me from enjoying the flowers.  Have a blessed spring just inhaling the beauty around you.

“Hold fast to your dreams, for without them life is a broken winged bird that cannot fly.”  Langston Hughes

Busy Season

Don’t ya just love spring?  Even though the stress of not getting everything done in time hangs over my head, the flowers and green everywhere just blesses me.

This year two plant sales for two different garden clubs means that I’m digging up plants that have spread and propagating others and potting them as quickly as I can.

Some of the early spring bloomers have to be savored quickly, like this Flag Iris.  These stunning and unusual flowers last a little longer than a week.

It’s good to have other types of bulb plants waiting to take their place.

Redbuds can also be a flash in the pan stunner.  This picture was taken from the highway.  It is either an Oklahoma Redbud or someone had done a good job of keeping a native trimmed to one trunk and nicely shaped like a tree.

Most Texas native Redbuds have multiple trunks with a rather shrubby look.  Doesn’t mean that I don’t like them.  I love their bright colors.

Yellow Columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha) or Granny’s Bonnet or Gold Spur Columbine is a wonderful spring blooming perennial.

The flowers are uniquely shaped and the foliage is evergreen.  Two pluses.  The yellow variety is native to Texas and does extremely well in our poor soil.  Morning sun and afternoon shade does the trick.

Wow.  Makes ones heart sing.

Another look at Bridal Wreath Spirea (Spiraea prunifolia) with lovely drooping branches that are covered in white clusters of flowers.  Hear wedding bells?

Spiderwort (Tradescantia pallida) is putting on a show.  It’s a Texas native that can’t take the summer heat but shines in spring.

Clusters of three petaled flowers with bright yellow stamens.

This David Austin rose, Lady of Shalott, is my new favorite.  It has a delectable aroma.

Since I absolutely adore roses and am wonderfully surprised at how well they do here in this lousy soil,  I’ve decided to put in some more rose beds.  Until the tiller we’ve ordered comes in, they are in pots.

The beds have to be built up and enriched with piles of decomposed leaves, manure, etc.  Therefore, it takes some time to prepare the beds.  We’re short of time now, so they will be in pots for awhile.

This unnamed rose bush blooms continuously once warm weather arrives.  And it has.

Hope you’re having a great spring enjoying the flowers in your yard or wherever you see and smell them.  Thanks for taking time to read my blog.

“Her nagging is a sign that she cares.  Her silence means she’s plotting your death.” unknown source

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