Rose Emporium, Part 2

The Antique Rose Emporium is so much fun to visit.

Yes, it is about antique, heritage, or old fashioned found roses, but there’s so much more.  They also sell other types of roses, plus succulents and other plants.

Another draw to this nursery is the large gardens that are perfect for strolling and savoring the smells.  The tall mushroom looking trellis is constructed from heavy rebar.  The rose covering it is either Lady Banks or Peggy Martin.  Both of these are vigorous growers, which is not a strong enough description of either one of them.

A huge stand of Mexican Cigar Plants (Cuphea melvillea) borders two sides of the walkway leading to the chapel, where their seminars are held.

They provide a bright, cheery welcome.

The chapel is off in the distance behind this prairie style planting of Salvias, Pink Muhly grass, roses, Purple Sage, and various other plants.

Morning light behind the grasses give them a nice glow.

I especially like how these clusters look like tiny stacked diamonds sparkling.

This tropical beauty is Sky Vine Thunbergia.  One tall and wide archway is overflowing with this vine.  Such a refreshing look.

The flowers on this bush look like Mexican Oregano but the leaves don’t.  Anyone know what it is.  Please let me know with a comment.

Have a blessed Thanksgiving holiday.  Enjoy your family more than you enjoy the food.

“Thanksgiving dinners takes eighteen hours to prepare.  They are consumed in twelve minutes.  Halftime takes twelve minutes. This is not a coincidence.”  Erma Bombeck

Prickly Plants

Last Saturday we attended a Native Plant Society of Texas Symposium at the Lady Bird Johnson Center in Austin.  There were some interesting speakers and one that read her speech.  Boring.

Afterwards, we strolled the gardens even it’s still early for many plants to be growing.

It is the season for the Texas Mountain Laurel (Dermatophyllum secundiflorum) to display their clusters of purple flowers that smell strongly of grape kool-aid.

There were also a few Giant Spiderworts (Tadescantia gigantea) already blooming.

Some sculptures from stone and thick glass were fascinating.

Nice use of stock tanks.

Another featured sculpture.  I’m not sure if these are permanent or not.

The stone is limestone, which contains lots of shells.

Muhlies are currently poplular as landscape plants.  The genus of this plant is named for a German Lutheran minister, Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg, who lived in Pennsylvania in the late 18th century and early 19th century.  He was also a botanist, chemist, and mineralogist.

This one is Pine Muhly (Muhlenbergia dubia Forn. ex Hemsl).

The Texas Persimmon or Mexican Persimmon (Diospyros texana scheele) is a small multi-branched tree that usually grows to about 15 feet tall.  The orange fruit turns to black when ripe.  Before it ripens, the fruit is so tart that it makes one’s mouth pucker.
Childhood memories of eating orange persimmons on my uncle’s farm makes me avoid them altogether now.

Lovely.

Cholla Cactus (Cylindropuntia imbricata) or Tree Cholla or Walking Stick Cholla grows in the hot deserts of West Texas or high in the Colorado mountains.

As a native Texan raised in West Texas where sharp, pointed, prickly plants are common, it is not my preferred type of plant.  But the violet flowers on these are bright and very pretty.
Green Sotol (Dasylirion leiophyllum) is another pokey plant.  Interestingly, it is used to produce an alcoholic drink called sotol.

Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa) is in the rose family.  How crazy is that.  It has white flowers and silvery or pink puffs of fruit heads that are said to resemble an Apache headdress.

I know that some people really love these plants.  There are many of these rustic plants growing out in the fields here, so we can enjoy them as we take walks.  But in my yard, I love flowers and more tame looking plants.

Thanks for taking the time to ready my blog.

“No one was ever named ‘Hero’ for following the crowd.  Heroes set their own course.”  Johnathan Lockwood Huie

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