Creative, Yet Easy

This a walk along memory lane from a time when we attended home tours.  One of those many canceled events because it is 2020 and the time of the epidemic.

Not sure if these are live plants or not, but they could easily be container plants, like Boxwood that can be trimmed and shaped.  The rounded form and the fancy pots make these stand out.

I like the idea of decorating something you already own.  This sled has a winter theme, but think about other items, like a tricycle.  Even though it can’t be hung, it could welcome guests to your front door.

So easy and yet, attractive.  Let the orange slices dry out before using them.

Just put a pot of Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) in pots and place them among cactus or agaves.  Of course, they are tropical, so they cannot be outside in really cold weather.  But you could use winter hardy violas or pansies in pots.

Or you might even decorate your agaves with gumballs.  They need to be strong enough to bear the extra weight.

Create Christmas trees with sheet music or tear the pages out of an old hymnal.

Decorate kitchen cabinets with purchased wreaths or create your own.  I personally would have chosen a brighter color for the bows.

Cut out Christmas ornaments out of heavy card stock and string them under a picture frame or old window.

This garland is made from folded squares of tissue paper.  Red and green tissue paper would make it more seasonal.  Add a string of lights and voila.

Fill any container with Christmas balls or other decorations hanging on small branches.

Use a baby buggy, wagon, or any other item used to transport whatever.  Fill it with anything Christmasy and you have a unique decoration.

This made me wish I had a old wooden tool box.  But other outside wooden or metal garden items would work.

Bake some gingerbread men and ladies, decorate, and string them together.  A clever hanging garland for anywhere.  Of course, then the remaining cookies can be eaten. However, these may be made of an inedible material.

Just a few borrowed ideas to get your creative juices flowing.

“Then the Grinch thought of something he hadn’t before! What if Christmas, he thought, doesn’t come from a store. What if Christmas…perhaps…means a little bit more!”
                                                                                                                       Dr. Seuss

Grand Old Ladies

Stately old houses have a unique charm.

This Queen Anne was part of a large estate built in the late 1800’s.

In 1926, it was sold for $7,000.  The original third floor tower with a finial was removed for safety reasons.

The woodwork throughout the house is stunning.

The magnificent parquet floors are in excellent condition.

Just look at the craftsmanship and challenging detail.

A large group of people were touring, so I couldn’t get many pictures inside this house.

This Queen Anne is a well-known landmark that sits on a hill beside a main highway at the edge of Weatherford.  Its location on a hill provided breezes that kept it cooler in the summer than most homes.  Five fireplaces kept it warm in the winter.

Detail woodwork added to the grandeur.  The house has ten bedrooms.  Originally, it had only one bathroom.

Many stained glass windows lets in some light without allowing the hot Texas sunlight inside.

I love old style stained glass – very nostalgic.

The house is currently a bed and breakfast.

The rooms are furnished with large scale beds.  Closet space has been turned into small bathrooms for each room.  One room has access to a hot tub in an enclosed area just outside the room.

A Greek Revival house build in 1890 suffered severe damage in a 2008 fire.  New owners restored the house with careful detail to keep its original style.

They made some concessions on material, covering the wraparound porch with this new, modern metal that is stronger and is fireproof.

These stained glass windows are hung as art pieces along with the old wooden panel.

Sorry for the blurry picture.

While doing renovation, this glass mirror was found under the house.  H. P. Newman company was founded in England in 1909 but the name was changed to Dorothy Perkins in 1919.  They specialize in women’s clothing and fashion.  The company was adept in changing styles in each decade and still manufactures women’s clothing.

The purses belonged to the homeowner’s aunt.

Cute way to utilize old family pictures.

This is the last of the Weatherford Christmas home tour.

Hope your Christmas is celebrated with friends and family and merry and bright.

“The reality is that old houses that were built a hundred years ago were built by actual craftsmen, people who were the best in the world at what they did. The little nuances in the woodwork, the framing of the doors, the built-in nooks, the windows—all had been done by smart, talented people …”  Joanna Gaines

Christmas Tour

The Annual Candlelight Tour of Homes in Weatherford usually features older 19th century homes.  However, the first home we visited was built in 2015 in the craftsman style of the late eighteen hundreds.  The builder is a well known local contractor who restores older homes and builds reproductions of those styles.

The wooden mantel actually is an period piece.

Plop some berries in a pencil holder and it looks Christmasy.

This is a decoupaged trunk to mimic the Victorian style.

All ready for Christmas dinner.

Nice touch with Magnolia leaves and a ball of berries.

I have a thing for stained glass lamps or stained glass anything that is good quality.  The small manager looks like Fontanini, which is very collectible.

The faience girl looks French.  Marie Antoinette? Its bright colors draws your eyes right to it.

Outside on a small upper balcony this display caught my attention.

Striking combination of red and white Poinsettias in a deep blue pot.

The back driveway made this a small yard.  But this side flowerbed provides space for a great Christmas vignette.  Pansies in front give it a little color.

“Do all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as ever you can.” Credited to John Wesley, but disputed by some

Houses on Tour

Usually Weatherford’s tour of homes features some Victorian homes that are creatively decked out for Christmas.  This year these were the only two houses that were older and nicely decorated; both have been on the tour before.

This house was originally a dog-trot house with an open air space in the middle and two rooms on each side.  Major restoration in 2001 transformed its look.

I think I took a picture of this pillow before with the intent to make one.  Hasn’t happened.

Botanical prints always catch my eye.

All working fireplaces were removed in the renovation, so this mantle is just an accent.

In place of traditional wainscoting, this embossed material has an interesting look and provides texture.

I’m a sucker for old wooden boxes holding almost anything.

Sloped ceilings make bed placements upstairs a challenge.  It looks like this spot is the only option.

The heavy, freestanding tub was moved upstairs and required reinforcing of the floor to handle its weight.

Next door a Queen Anne style home, that was constructed in 1902, also has had several renovations with a master bedroom and bath built at the back of the house.

Another wooden box with an old look used to decorate.

The crown molding has an interesting ornate piece of wood that extends out.  That would cover up any mistakes in cutting miter corners.  We have miters for crown molding, which are tricky.

The bottom molding also has an inset center of molded wood.

This is interesting and has a rustic look, but personally I think the wood pieces should all in the same color family.

Main hallway, where the old dogtrot space was, is nicely decorated.

The kitchen is dark with only light from doors.  I like the door bows but don’t know how practical they are if doors are opened often during the holiday season.

A long hallway runs across the back of the house to the new bedroom and bath.

A few pictures from another house.  The small sled hanging near the entry provides a cheery greeting.

Although I do not like the color scheme, this pillow is a reminder of how aging changes our perception of ourselves.

Wonder who bought this plaque – husband or wife?

This is the last post about Christmas home tours.

Thank you for reading my blog in 2016.  Have a happy New Year and keep safe.

“People are so worried about what they eat between Christmas and New Year’s Day.  What they should be worried about is what they eat between New Year’s Day and Christmas.”  Unknown

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