Candlelight Tour at Weatherford

After 37 years of a tour of homes at Christmas in a small town, it’s no surprise that it’s difficult to get people to open their homes.  At least, that’s what I assume, since most of the homes this year were small and not unique.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Cultural Center, so we always start at the museum.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Culture Center.  So that’s where we always start.

The western tree is always impressive.

One of the trees is this small pencil tree.

The Loving- Pinner house was built in 1857.  The house is well known because Oliver Loving, the cattle rancher who started the Goodnight-Loving trail, lived there from 1862 to 1866.  This small house with two bedrooms was where he and his wife raised nine children.

Fortunately, most of the year in Texas is warm or hot, so the children could have slept outside on the covered porch.  During the winter, they must have been stacked like firewood on the floor.  The cabinets with the glass doors were in the master bedroom.  The house still has the original porch, doors with hardware, high ceilings, and glass transoms.  But I’m not sure when these cabinets were installed.

This panel has older looking scenes, but there was no mention of age.

This Second Empire French Neo-Renaissance style house was constructed of hand quarried native stone.  Therefore, the outside walls are 20 inches thick.

In the small entry, a spiral staircase was handcrafted.  The banister was made from a single pine tree.  Using heat, it was twisted to fit the curve of the staircase.

The staircase in the back of the house leads from the upstairs down to the dining room.  The house features curved walls in most rooms.

The chandelier over the dining room table is original to the house and is from France.

Bathroom sink installed in old sewing machine cabinet.

This piano is old and extremely heavy.

The gingerbread man on this pillow is three dimensional.

It was a cold, rainy, blustery day outside, but people still came out to see the homes.

“Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking bout how it is soaking in around your green beans.”

Houses on Tour

Usually Weatherford’s tour of homes features some Victorian homes that are creatively decked out for Christmas.  This year these were the only two houses that were older and nicely decorated; both have been on the tour before.

This house was originally a dog-trot house with an open air space in the middle and two rooms on each side.  Major restoration in 2001 transformed its look.

I think I took a picture of this pillow before with the intent to make one.  Hasn’t happened.

Botanical prints always catch my eye.

All working fireplaces were removed in the renovation, so this mantle is just an accent.

In place of traditional wainscoting, this embossed material has an interesting look and provides texture.

I’m a sucker for old wooden boxes holding almost anything.

Sloped ceilings make bed placements upstairs a challenge.  It looks like this spot is the only option.

The heavy, freestanding tub was moved upstairs and required reinforcing of the floor to handle its weight.

Next door a Queen Anne style home, that was constructed in 1902, also has had several renovations with a master bedroom and bath built at the back of the house.

Another wooden box with an old look used to decorate.

The crown molding has an interesting ornate piece of wood that extends out.  That would cover up any mistakes in cutting miter corners.  We have miters for crown molding, which are tricky.

The bottom molding also has an inset center of molded wood.

This is interesting and has a rustic look, but personally I think the wood pieces should all in the same color family.

Main hallway, where the old dogtrot space was, is nicely decorated.

The kitchen is dark with only light from doors.  I like the door bows but don’t know how practical they are if doors are opened often during the holiday season.

A long hallway runs across the back of the house to the new bedroom and bath.

A few pictures from another house.  The small sled hanging near the entry provides a cheery greeting.

Although I do not like the color scheme, this pillow is a reminder of how aging changes our perception of ourselves.

Wonder who bought this plaque – husband or wife?

This is the last post about Christmas home tours.

Thank you for reading my blog in 2016.  Have a happy New Year and keep safe.

“People are so worried about what they eat between Christmas and New Year’s Day.  What they should be worried about is what they eat between New Year’s Day and Christmas.”  Unknown

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Cowboy Christmas Decor and Tiny House

On December tenth, the 35th annual Candlelight Tour of Homes in Weatherford came on our first really cold day with a sharp, biting wind.

Inside the Doss Heritage and Culture Center Christmas cheer was in the decorations, greetings and refreshments.

This western tree was my favorite.

A saddle and a saddle blanket and other cowboy items replaced a tree skirt.

A cow hide and cowboy rope finished out the “ensemble”.

The different elements of cowboy and traditional decorations came together for a pleasing whole.

The weight and bulk of the saddle on top had to be held up with cord to attach it to the ceiling.  Just love the look.

In the bathroom was another striking decoration that screamed Texas cowgirl.

A more usual sort of Christmas arrangement was bright and welcoming.

A tiny house parked downtown across from the court house was our second stop.  The ladder was used as a handrail because those steps were rather high.

A young couple built this and is trying to get a business off the ground.

The house is 19 feet x 6 feet with 174 square feet.

Just inside the door to our left was the seating of the house.  This sofa faced a flat screen TV hung on the wall in front of it.  For me, it was too close for comfortable viewing.  Although it doesn’t look like it, surely there was storage under the cushions.

This small window was above the couch and higher than my eye level.

This triangular shelf above the front (and only) door provides a small place for decorations or storage.

The kitchen counter has two stools at this end for dining.  There were cutting boards piled on top of the stools.  Don’t know why.  To the right is a refrigerator and small stove with a sliver of a closet.

Beyond the kitchen is the bathroom.

Up the stairs is a crawl in space for a bedroom.

This tiny house concept is definitely not for me.  My opinion:  only the young could handle this lifestyle, even as a vacation getaway.

Many questions:  Where are clothes stored?  Where does one put those clothes on?  Where do you store anything?  How do you not feel claustrophobic?

Merry Christmas and happy holidays.  Thank you for reading my blog.  A special thanks to those faithful readers who make me feel that this is worthwhile.  I love to hear from you.

“Dear Santa, I want a new birthday suit for Christmas.  My current one is old, wrinkled, and sagging.”

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