Cafe at the Ridge Garden Vignettes

Our Master Gardeners Club took a day trip last week to the Kerrville area.  Our first stop was Café at the Ridge outside of town.  Originally it was called Roadkill Cafe.  About 12 years ago a new owner renovated it and put in a bakery, a garden, a nursery, and a gift shop.

Immediately I knew I would love this place.

Usually, whiskey barrels are cut in half for a flower pot.  This arrangement of three different ways to use the barrels make them much more unique.

Behind the railing is the porch area for the cafe.  We ate a delicious lunch there.

The wood is mesquite, which is expensive because it takes a long time for trunks to get large.

The pot on the left contains a Hardy Hibiscus.  Behind that is Dusty Miller with its lacy gray leaves.  On the right are some Daylilies and mystery yellow flowers.

This picture is to show the use of a broken pot.  In the center, surrounded by Begonias is a large pot that has parts of the pot stuck in the remaining large section.  There is also a bright blue pot placed inside.

Even though I like yard art, I don’t care for the hanging sunflower circles.

Another reconstructed clay pot contains plants and a fairy garden.

Unusual.

Lots of brightly colored pots for sale.

The theme of the garden seemed to be:  use as many unique items as flower pots as possible.  Here, old chest drawers were attached to legs and hold Foxtail Fern, Woodland Fern, and Begonias.  Not sure about the dark leafed plant.

A concrete basket contains Dusty Miller, Pentas, and maybe Penstemon.

A seesaw for adults

I’m always on the look out for old metal cars.  So far, no luck or they are too costly.

The round plaque would be nicer if it were more legible.

I actually have an old enamel pot that I need to drill holes in so it can be a planter.

The plant in the large pot looks like a Mexican Flame Vine (Pseudogynosux chenpodiodes) and the purple leafed one behind it is Princess Caroline Napier Grass, which is a Texas Super Star plant.

Because the Mexican Flame Vine is zone 9 -10, I have to move it into the shed for winter.  I bought it at a garden club sale in Waco but didn’t realize it was too tropical for here.  But it is beautiful.

Even old tires can become planters.  Not sure how they folded the tire back after cutting the zigzags.

A word about yard art.  This place has an overabundance of it.  But they are selling plants, pots, yard art, and suggesting ways to use plants.

The “tea and brie” set look down their noses at yard art.  But it can be used effectively.  First, one should see and enjoy the plants.  Then, wandering through the garden, one should encounter pleasant surprises that makes one smile, such as yard art.

In the city, that can be more challenging because of yard space, and because  some community rules prevent it.  But enjoy it when you can.

Lamb’s Ear in front.  The bedstead in the back has been turned into a plant protector.  In the center is a wire grid tepee that can be covered with plastic to shade plants from the sun.

Note the posts for this porch – cages filled with chunks of glass.

This picture was taken to show the Bottle Tree.  Haven’t seen one with that shaped frame.

I was enamored with this place, so lots of pictures.  Next post will continue with more from this nursery.

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Antique Rose Emporium, Last Part

One last look from our visit to this fabulous nursery.

roseemp0The old weathered sign expresses the feel of this place.

roseemp1A pot of Begonias next to an Agave.

roseemp2They do a good job of just mixing in all sorts of plants.

roseemp3Don’t know what this plant is.  It looks tropical and is shaded by the tree.  Lovely.

roseemp4Roses everywhere.  In the springtime, this is the place to come and smell the roses.

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roseemp6This section is playful.

roseemp5The rabbit in the wheel barrel with plants spilling out of pots is delightful.

roseemp7The plants with the purple flowers behind the scene look like Philippine Violets (Barleria cristata).

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roseemp9Wood Ferns, Philippine Violets, Cigar Plant:  this breaks the rule that plants with the same watering needs should be planted together.  Now I don’t feel so guilty for doing the same thing.

roseempaMike Shoup, the owner of the nursery, presented some new roses that they now sell.  Although the backbone of their business will always be antique roses, he says that producers are coming out with bushes that have some of the same characteristics of antique roses:  such as fragrance, diverse forms, and hardiness.

I’m sure his presentation increased the sales that day.  I know I couldn’t resist one of the new roses.

roseempbA Salvia Greggii with white flowers.

roseempdThe purple grasses look like Napier (Pennisetum purpureum), which are perennials that will return in the spring in most of the state.

roseempeI don’t know what the purple flowers are, but this picture was taken to show the trellis behind them.  Several different types of of trellises are scattered around the gardens.  I think this one is made of bamboo.

roseempfThis small dead tree is used to hold up a climbing vine.

roseempgAny ole stone statute can be used as an accent.

roseemphEven the public restrooms are in a unique building.  The hedges on the left serve as a privacy fence for the usual line of women awaiting their turn.

roseempiGreat use of large clay pots.

roseempjSucculents for sale are displayed on an old cart.

roseempkAntique Rose Emporium had its origin in selling rescued roses from cemeteries and old home sites.  Now it is a wonderful garden with a very diverse display of plants and a joy to visit.

“Despite our many differences here in America and around the world, when we meet in the garden we find ourselves united in our love of nature, beauty, and the sheer awesomeness of life.”  Old House Gardens