A Mixed Bag of Color and Scent

Higher temperatures indicate that summer is just around the corner.  But almost two inches of rain last week brought relief and appreciation.

Roses have been blooming like crazy.  Belinda’s Dream on the left is usually the star, but at this time, Katy Rose has outpaced it with blooms.

As the flowerbed curves on around, yellow rose bushes and Ox-eye daisies are also blooming profusely.  When walking around this bed, the heavenly scent is wonderful.

Although not a spectacular flower form, this rose bush makes up for that with the sheer number of blooms and its reliability to bloom over and over each year.

This rose and the one seen in the pot behind it are the results of propagation.  I’ve been experimenting with different methods with varying success.  These started with cuttings in small pots that were placed in a clear plastic bag.  The soil was watered well, but not soggy, and the bag sealed.  The condensation in the bag keeps the soil moist and provides a greenhouse environment.

After about six weeks, it was still alive, so I removed the bag and left the pot on the southern window sill.  Since some cuttings lived and others died, I’m not sure which bushes these came from.

In April, I was on a nature walk with a Texas Naturalist group.  This picture shows mistletoe growing on the lower trunk of a tree.  Notice also that the bark is crumbling in places.

We all have heard that the age of a tree can be determined by its number of inner rings.  That can be done with a plug taken from the tree.

The age of a tree can also be determined by the layers of the bark, which is seen in this picture.  Wow.  This information can from a retired botany professor in our group.  Isn’t that neat.

Last year I learned first hand how irresponsible it is not to trim back an Autumn Clematis.

Because the vine was so thick and heavy, the whole trellis with its bottom in concrete came out of the ground.

Now I’m seeing the consequences of not cutting this Jackman Clematis (Clematis ‘Jackmanii’) back.  I checked it in winter, but it’s dead stems seemed sparse and not a problem.

But the new growth is all bunched up on top and not attaching itself to the trellis.  My husband staked the trellis to a fence pole behind it to hopefully keep it from toppling over.

A couple of years ago I planted yellow yarrow, which spreads nicely, in the water trough container to shade the lower part of the vine.  Clematis needs shaded “feet” and sunny vines.

This Clematis is covered with flowers several times a year.

Have a super day.

“The problem with the world is that intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence.”  Charles Bukowski

Gardens at Biltmore

The gardens at Biltmore are fabulous, as expected.

gardensThe wooded garden area is huge, and I doubt that we saw all of it.  It is naturalistic in design, but definitely has some order to it.  There are wide paved paths through sunny and shady areas.

Most of the shrubs were unfamiliar to me.

biltmoreflowersBut a few had labels.  This Weigela (Weigela florida) in the honeysuckle family is gorgeous.

gardens2At one spot, there was a glimpse into the more formal gardens.  The wooden arbor seen here is in the center of the gardens that are laid out symmetrically.

gardensdAt the main steps that lead down into the formal gardens, almost the whole garden is in view.  In the far back is the conservatory with tropical plants.  These were popular on large estates during the Victorian age.  Today, they are found in large public gardens.

gardens4A type of Beebalm, maybe.  A reader provided the information that this is a Centaurea.  Glad to know.

gardens5Tall spikes of Gomphrena pop with the shaded wall background.

gardens6Japanese Iris require an acidic soil, so we certainly cannot grow them here.

gardensaaAlmost all of the flowers were planted in generous groupings.

gardensaaaThe white tree in the background at the right caught my attention.

gardensbCloser, it’s still a mystery.

gardensbbAh ha – a Fringe Tree (Chionanthus virginicus).  I’ve only seen ones with orange blossoms in our area.

gardenscLots of different types of Bearded Irises scattered throughout the garden.

gardensccA large rose garden area had all kinds of different varieties.  It was a little too early in the year for them to be in full bloom.

gardensdd

gardenseBehind the wall at the back of the gardens are greenhouses plus a nursery.

biltmoreflowers3Love the contrasting colors.

gardensf

biltmoreflowers4The Peonies blew me away.

biltmoreflowers6It is just too hot and dry here to grow them.

biltmoreflowers7But, if I could, I’d have a whole yard of them.

biltmoreflowers8Love them all.

gardensgPretty color in the petals but unknown to me.

gardensggThis white plant was very strange and was in two different spots.  I couldn’t tell if they were bulbs that needed to keep their foliage until it all shriveled up or if it was a plant with that color of foliage.

gardenshEuphorbia Lime Green bush.

gardenshhVery striking.

gardensiiThe flower beds along the outside walls were wide and layered.  Very attractive with the wooded garden behind them.  Wonder how they weed?

gardenskClematis

gardenskkAzaleas that must be young plants.

gardensjjIn one corner of the wall was what looked like a house.  I figured it was a storage area for gardening supplies, but it might have been a house for a gardener at one time.  Behind the lady, who was a gardener putting out bedding plants, and to her right is an arched exit that leads into more wooded garden areas.

“Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity.”  Lindley Karstens