Gardens at Biltmore

The gardens at Biltmore are fabulous, as expected.

gardensThe wooded garden area is huge, and I doubt that we saw all of it.  It is naturalistic in design, but definitely has some order to it.  There are wide paved paths through sunny and shady areas.

Most of the shrubs were unfamiliar to me.

biltmoreflowersBut a few had labels.  This Weigela (Weigela florida) in the honeysuckle family is gorgeous.

gardens2At one spot, there was a glimpse into the more formal gardens.  The wooden arbor seen here is in the center of the gardens that are laid out symmetrically.

gardensdAt the main steps that lead down into the formal gardens, almost the whole garden is in view.  In the far back is the conservatory with tropical plants.  These were popular on large estates during the Victorian age.  Today, they are found in large public gardens.

gardens4A type of Beebalm, maybe.  A reader provided the information that this is a Centaurea.  Glad to know.

gardens5Tall spikes of Gomphrena pop with the shaded wall background.

gardens6Japanese Iris require an acidic soil, so we certainly cannot grow them here.

gardensaaAlmost all of the flowers were planted in generous groupings.

gardensaaaThe white tree in the background at the right caught my attention.

gardensbCloser, it’s still a mystery.

gardensbbAh ha – a Fringe Tree (Chionanthus virginicus).  I’ve only seen ones with orange blossoms in our area.

gardenscLots of different types of Bearded Irises scattered throughout the garden.

gardensccA large rose garden area had all kinds of different varieties.  It was a little too early in the year for them to be in full bloom.

gardensdd

gardenseBehind the wall at the back of the gardens are greenhouses plus a nursery.

biltmoreflowers3Love the contrasting colors.

gardensf

biltmoreflowers4The Peonies blew me away.

biltmoreflowers6It is just too hot and dry here to grow them.

biltmoreflowers7But, if I could, I’d have a whole yard of them.

biltmoreflowers8Love them all.

gardensgPretty color in the petals but unknown to me.

gardensggThis white plant was very strange and was in two different spots.  I couldn’t tell if they were bulbs that needed to keep their foliage until it all shriveled up or if it was a plant with that color of foliage.

gardenshEuphorbia Lime Green bush.

gardenshhVery striking.

gardensiiThe flower beds along the outside walls were wide and layered.  Very attractive with the wooded garden behind them.  Wonder how they weed?

gardenskClematis

gardenskkAzaleas that must be young plants.

gardensjjIn one corner of the wall was what looked like a house.  I figured it was a storage area for gardening supplies, but it might have been a house for a gardener at one time.  Behind the lady, who was a gardener putting out bedding plants, and to her right is an arched exit that leads into more wooded garden areas.

“Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity.”  Lindley Karstens

Lilies and More

Back home, the results of recent rains continue to shine.  I’ll post more about our trip later.

bulbsThe Kindly Light Daylily’s (Hemerocallis ‘Kindly Light’) bright color and quirkly petals scream for attention.

bulbs1They spread nicely, too.

bulbs9Crimson Pirate Daylily (Hemerocallis ‘Crimson Pirate’) like most daylilies isn’t very picky.  It like well-drained soil, full sun or partial sun, and tolerates heat and humidity.

bulbs6The flowers on the old fashioned, pass along Daylilies aren’t as large as they used to be.  They desperately needed to be divided, but the heavy clay makes that a difficult job.  Maybe I could plan a dividing party.  Wonder who would come?

bulbs4Two Daylily bulbs were growing out in the grass, so I transplanted them.  Now they’ve spread.  In front of them is a Salvia Greggi.

bulbs2

bulbs5Sorry the hanging flower buds on this Clematis are a little out of focus.  I have waited for four years for this to bloom and almost yanked it out of the ground a number of times, but patience paid off.  So far, the flowers are not that impressive.

bulbs7Purple Leatherflower Clematis (Clematis pitcheri Torr.A. Gray) is a Texas native and is fairly heat and drought tolerant.

The purple in the background is Larkspur.

bulbs8Because all clematis like their feet in the shade and the vine in the sun, I stacked some rocks at the bottom of it in an attempt to shade the roots from the low west afternoon sun.  But now the plants around it have grown up enough to help shade them.

bulbsaDesert Rose (Adenium obesum) is finally blooming again.  It’s weird shaped trunk bottom is supposed to be part of its charm.  Each year, it is supposed to be repotted to a just slightly larger pot with the bulb lifted a little higher.  I haven’t done that yet because I don’t want to disturb the blooms.

To the left is a pot of Kolanchoe.  So many new kinds of Kolanchoe are being developed, which I hope are as hardy as the older ones.  Beside that is a new type of Dusty Miller that is a succulent.  On top of the cart is a Begonia.

bulbsbThis Beebalm ( Monarda  didyma) has grown really tall.  To keep it from laying on the ground, I put a wire cage around it.  It was probably planted in the wrong place since they prefer full sun and space for wind to blow around and through them.

bulbscCrazy looking flowers.  I’m still waiting to see lots of pollinators on them.

bulbsdSo much is growing and blooming now that it is hard to focus.  We have been so blessed with rain and mild weather.  The heavy duty heat will come, so we need to savor this time.

“Cavities are like parking tickets; they show up by surprise and take all your pocket money.”  unknown