Last View at Chandor Gardens

A few more pictures from our quiet stroll through Chandor Gardens.

Garden paths lead to calming scenes with water.

And some rather bizarre scenes of Chandor’s obsessions with Chinese culture.  This looks like volcanic rock used as a display case for oriental statutes.

Another display of red panels gives a suggestion about the importance of red in the Chinese culture, where it represents luck, joy, and happiness.  Brides wear red to ward off evil.

About eight Staghorn Ferns hang from a large oak.

Ah, back to a soothing pool surrounded by greenery.

Rare for this area is a pot of Kent’s Beauty Oregano with its fluffy flowers.

A lush area with lots of foliage.

As we head to the Chandor home, more water and assorted plants.

More potted plants topped off with a new variety of Coleus.

On the back side of the house is an enclosed patio area that has an intimate feeling.

Inside the walled area is a long planting of Pentas and Caladiums,which are cheery and refreshing.

One of my favorite features is this gate leading out of the patio.

The story goes that Chandor admired the gate at a friend’s house.  His friend then gifted it to him.  From the note, they may have been used over windows at Vincent’s home.

Now these lovely gates can be admired by all who visit this public garden.

What a special place Chandor Gardens is to this small town situated in a dry climate.

“At the heart of gardening, there is a belief in the miraculous.”  Mirabel Osler

Visit Chandor Gardens

Another look at what Chandor Gardens has to offer.

There are surprises along the pathways and stairs that climb to different levels of the garden.

Some of the newer structures don’t exactly fit in with the more formal sections, but are unique.

For the waterfall, the original builder and owner, Douglas Chandor, had to haul in soil and large rocks.  This was done without large equipment and one helper.

Pentas were in bloom and placed in several places in the garden.  They didn’t show any wilting from the heat but were fresh and lovely.

Maybe Bleeding Heart but don’t know for sure.

Stepping stones across a shallow pool.

Tied Bamboo poles give the illusion of sails on a small Chinese sampan boat.

Chinese statuary in different spots all around the garden makes me wonder why Chandor was so taken with that culture.

Chinese Button Bush (Adina Ruella) looks a little like the North American Button Bush (Cephalanthus occidentalis).  But it’s parts are more distinct and pop out against dark foliage.  This was in a mostly shady area on the edge of a small stream.

Chandor’s home is used for special events.

This Magnolia looks healthy, even in the extreme dry heat.

One of the many water features, this Pixie Pond is another place to relax and enjoy the sound and sight of water.

Cast stone pixies in different poses are placed on top of the stone (or brick) edges around the pond.  Chandor chose them and placed them himself, probably in the late 40’s.

The next post will be the final one on Chandor Gardens.

“We never know the worth of water till the well is dry.”  Thomas Fuller

Chandor Gardens

One of my favorite public gardens is Chandor Gardens in Weatherford, TX.  The travel time from our house to the gardens is two and a half hours, so it’s an easy day trip.

Another reason we enjoy it so much is that it’s mostly shady with some open areas that are sunny.  Even in the summertime, if the mercury hasn’t shot up too high, it’s comfortable to visit there.

Originally, the gardens were private and the result of the dream of one man.  He and a hired hand did most of the construction.  An Englishman, Douglas Chandor, married a Texas gal who wanted to live in her hometown.

Work on the garden began in 1936.  Chandor was a renown portrait artist, who painted presidents, famous people, and a queen.  He brought that artist eye to the garden that he labored on for many years.

Chandor built the Chi-Ling fountain using statutes found in New York city, Coke and 7 Up bottles, colored marbles, and his handmade ceramic tiles.  Because the original fountain was crumbling apart, restoration was completed this year re-using as much of his materials as possible.

Two rows of soda bottles continue around the base of the fountain.

I was glad to see that they saved the original parts from the fountain and have them displayed in a section of Mondo Grass.

Every time we visit, new items have been added, like these twisted glass accents that pop right out of the white Caladiums.

Usually, Canna Lilies have red, orange, or yellow flowers.  These are the first pink ones I’ve seen.

Monkey Grass and Little Ruby Alternanthera form a thick groundcover.

The large concrete pot gives nice height to the ground covers.  There doesn’t seem to be any bare ground in the gardens.  The only places without plants are walkways.

Chandor was enchanted with China and Asian art and styles.  I don’t care for the
Buddhas, but his use of water and rock is admirable.  He embedded marbles in the  Buddha Niche and decorated the rock walls with lotus blossoms created with cut rocks. Water pours out of the blossoms.

Six of these dividers form a line between two sections of the garden.  I don’t think these are original.

Chandor’s love for the Orient is evident everywhere.

Moon Gate was built in 1949 and was constructed by the artist with mortar, stone, roof tiles, split sewer pipe, bottles, and handmade ceramic figurines.

Looking up, these figurines look authentic.

Chandor Gardens is a fascinating place and has a peacefulness to it.  We usually visit on week days, so it’s extra quiet to stroll the meandering pathways.

The work of one man is enjoyed by many visitors.  Just thinking of all those years of back breaking labor, as well as continuing with his portraits of the famous is overwhelming.  It’s a good thing he spend half of each year in New York painting.

The city of Weatherford now owns the estate and keeps up the gardens.  Quite a chore for a small town.

“Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.” Thomas Merton

Chandor Gardens

One of the stops on the Weatherford tour of homes in December was Chandor Gardens.

chandorThis is one of my favorite gardens.  You can read more about it and its history in the link above this picture.

chandor1I don’t know what kind of holly this is, but it has been trimmed into a tree, as seen in the previous picture.

chandor2This might be a salvia, but I’m not sure.  It sure is blooming late.  Even though Weatherford is north of us, we’ve obviously had harder freezes this season.  Or it could be that this garden is more protected than mine since we’re on a hill in the open with lots of wind.

chandor3There are several water areas.  Since we were with family, I focused on enjoying the garden with them and not so much on pictures.

chandor5Every time I visit this garden, I’m reminded that I need more evergreen bushes in my yard because this looks lush even in the winter.

chandor6That is probably a small rose bush still in bloom.

chandor7This is a larger pond.  As I remember, it has a concrete bottom.

chandor8Another great aspect of Chandor is the hardscape that enhances the greenery but also draws ones eyes into the garden.  This serves to create a desire for more exploring.

There are other posts about this garden with more information.

“The problem we have is that 47% of Americans who pay zero income tax is voting on what to charge everyone else.”               Steven Crowder