Hard Work U.

College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, Missouri, is unique in that students do not pay tuition.  Instead, they each work 15 hours a week at a specific job on campus.  If they need help paying room and board, they can work during the summer months to earn that.

The campus is stunning and all the students we met were outgoing and polite.  The building behind this pond is the cafeteria.  One of the campus jobs is cooking the meals.  I don’t know how much supervision is involved, but at other places we saw, mostly students doing the work and running the place.

There is a large museum featuring Ozark crafts, dishes, furniture, etc.  The vehicle shown is from the Beverly Hillbillies show.  Students were selling tickets and walking around answering questions.

Some years ago, a major news channel did a show about the university and gave it the nickname Hard Work University.  It stuck and has been proudly adopted by the college.

This large bed has banana trees (I think that’s what they are), Elephant Ears, salvias, and other hardy plants.

This is a Tropical Milkweed (Asclepias Curassavica).  Actually, there is a controversy brewing about this plant right now.  It is obviously not native and could have a fungus growing on it that is harmful to the Monarch Butterfly.  Since this is the only plant where Monarchs lay their eggs and is the only food source for their caterpillars, there is concern about this.  Research is continuing, and the opposing opinions are strong.

Another job for students is running the grist mill and the store that sells cornmeal.

In other buildings they make stained glass, jams and jellies, and fruitcakes.  All these employ students to cover their tuition.  At the entrance to the campus, visitors check in, where a student gives them information about the school and how it all works.

One of the amazing things to us was how many visitors this campus draws.  So there are plenty of customers for their products.

Wondered what kind of pine this is.  Very stately.

Something for other private schools to consider.

Students in the Horticulture department were having a plant sale, featuring Crysanthemums, Celosias, what looks like Cattail pond plants, and whatever the tall tropical plants with the big leaves are.  Some of the greenhouses were open.  In one, they were selling succulents.  I asked one student if her major was horticulture.  She said no, but she grew up on a farm, loved plants, and wanted to work in the greenhouses.  So I guess students get some choices about their jobs.

What a truly pleasant place to spend a day.

“Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice.”  Henry Ford

Before the First Frost

Our first freeze was a few days ago with a low of 28.  So it’s farewell to flowers and warm weather.  Being forewarned by the meteorologists, we took an afternoon and hauled pot plants into the sheds.  Of course, that time included cleaning out the sheds and carrying some things, like fertilizer spreaders, that won’t be needed this winter to the barn.

Both metal sheds have skylights and blown insulation.  One has a heater sensitive to temperatures.  That’s where ferns and other tender plants are stored.  Plants that I don’t want to freeze but can survive some cold go into the other shed.

fall2yardOne final bloom from the tropical Hibiscus.  I know I show a lot of pictures from this bush.  But, in my defense, the flower color is stunning.

fall2yard4These small pots of Ajuga Bugel Weed (Ajuga reptans) go into the shed.  If the plants were in the ground, then they should come survive.  But I’m not sure how well they would do in the pots.  Most often, Ajuga functions as ground cover, but I can’t decide where I want to use them.

The African Bulbine (Bulbine frutescens ‘Orange’) definitely has to be protected.  It’s one of those plants sold way north from its home.  Probably, the big box stores intend for customers to use them as annuals.  Crazy me.  I get attached to plants.

fallyardhThese mums are local buys that will be carried inside and out as needed for decorations.  Then next spring, I’ll plant them in a flowerbed or larger pots.

fallyardiThis variety was bought at a grocery store – couldn’t resist.

fallyardjThe red tips caught my eye.

fallcolor4Roses were still blooming right up until the freeze.  These are Knock-outs with some Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia)  in front.

fall2yard2Katy Road Roses are central Texas hardy that survive blazing summers and intermittent freezes during the winters.

fall2yard3I don’t know the name of this rose, but it, also, is a hardy bush here.  Roses are actually easy to grow.  Until we moved here, I didn’t have a place for them.  They absolutely must have sun and some water.  Drip system works well.

fallyardgYellow Knock Out Roses.

fallyardePink Knock-Outs.

fallyardcI always dread for the last blossoms on Duranta (Duranta erecta) to die because I know it will be months and months until they bloom again in late July.

fallcolorSome of first signs of autumn here are the red berries and golden orangeish leaves on the Chinese Pistache tree (Pistacia chinensis).

fallcolor3The Red Oak leaves turning copper are next.

fallcolor7This is a different Red Oak, and it’s covered with acorns.

fallcolor5Finally, the berries on Possomhaw (Ilex decidua) get larger and turn bright red.

Nature is always in flux, as we must be.

May you and your family have time together to celebrate the blessings of life.

“Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord;                                             let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation.                             Let us come before him with thanksgiving                                         and extol Him with music and song.”             Psalm 95:1-2