Magnolia Market

If there is anyone in Texas, and maybe even the US, that hasn’t heard of Chip and Joanna Gaines and their HGTV show Fixer Upper show, I would be surprised.  During the success of their show, they expanded their entrepreneurship to include products, a bed and breakfast, a restaurant soon to be opened and Magnolia Market.

The purchase of silos and buildings in downtown Waco allowed them to open new stores and a whole complex.

Visitors get the obligatory picture under the sign.

We took the advice on their website that late afternoon on a weekday was the best time to visit to avoid huge crowds.

The silos themselves are not yet open but will be in the future.

There is lots of outside space for play.  The artificial grass is used for kids and adults to toss around frisbees and balls.

Tables and seating under awnings are provided so people can “dine” from the food trucks.

More tables under a large open pavilion.  The bean bag seats in the shade promote their sale in the store.  They look comfy, but we did not try them.

Shade is a necessity, not a luxury,  in the Texas sun, even in spring.

Joanna is a fan of rusty metal and objects in their unfinished condition.  Me, too.

Inside the store, the displays are so pretty that people can’t resist lingering.  I read a comment online that Joanna’s touch is evident throughout the complex.  True.

The planters outside contain real plants.  Inside, lots of artificial flowers are used and sold.  Gorgeous color of faux tulips class up a rustic table.

People have complained that most of the products for sell are imports from China.  And that they are expensive.   Really?  What would one expect?  Joanna uses those imports to decorate on Fixer Upper, and people are enamored with the results.

Of course, she also uses local craftsmen, but those items would be priced out of most people’s range.

As one exits the front door, a vignette draws attention.  Think these plants are fake, too.

Swings and tables encourage people to sit and enjoy the whole atmosphere.

The small bakery (not shown), which sells cupcakes from Joanna’s recipe, had a long line in the sun.  We decided to pass on that.

The complex also includes a seed and plant store and garden area, which will be featured in my next blog.

Thanks for reading.

“Summer peels open the magnolia blossoms one white petal at a time to scent the summer breeze with thoughts of romance.”  Susie Clevenger

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Texas Independence

Washington on the Brazos is the place where Texans declared their independence from Mexico.  We visited this site when we were in nearby Brenham last November.

A replica of the original building gives a feel for the gathering of delegates.

While settlers were escaping from Santa Anna’s army and the battle at the Alamo was raging, men gathered to decide the fate of their homes and lives.  The convention lasted for 17 days; the representatives wrote a new constitution and organized an interim government as they created the Republic of Texas.

“Fellow-Citizens of Texas: The enemy are upon us. A strong force surrounds the walls of the Alamo, and threaten that garrison with the sword…Now is the day, and now is the hour, when Texas expects every man to do his duty. Let us show ourselves worthy to be free and we shall be free.”
Henry Smith, Washington, TX – March 2, 1836

 

Nearby is a living history farm.  A display was set up at the ticket booth entrance. The green Osage orange (Maclura pomifera) is not an edible fruit, in my opinion.  I’ve only known them as Horse Apples.

Some sprigs of purple heart add a little color.

On the same table is a basket of gourds.  These were used for drinking cups, ladles, and other vessels.

This fence style was probably brought to Texas with the early settlers from other states that came with Stephen Austin.

This dogtrot or dog run house has all the characteristics that define it.  A wide open space provided a way for wind to blow through to cool the house in the hot summers.  Two fireplaces heated the two rooms on each side in the winter.

The house belonged to Dr. Anson Jones, the first president of the new republic.  It was built in 1844 and was moved to this location in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial Celebration.

The Jones family lived in the house when it was on a farm in Brazoria.  He, his wife, their four children, his wife’s four half-sisters, and slaves lived on the farm.

Today this farm represents the lifestyle of the early settlers.

The master bedroom is decorated to look like it would have in those times.

A baby bed is set up beside the bed.

And a drawer at the end of the bed could sleep another young child or be used as storage.

On the fireplace mantle is a picture of Dr. Jones.  Not sure why it is covered with cheese cloth.

The second bedroom shows a chamber pot under the bed.

Other indoor conveniences include toiletry items and a wash basin.

The outside kitchen prevented the risks from cooking fires and kept heat in the summer away from the house.

The cook was preparing sweet potatoes for lunch.

The sweltering heat of summer and the bitter cold of always comes to my mind when I see how the pioneers lived.  Then I remember that millions of people today live in worse conditions.

How blessed we are to live in this time and in this place.

“The sharp thorn often produces delicate roses.”  Ovid

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Menard Community Garden

Menard, Texas, is a small town with concerned citizens.  One couple has taken on the project of educating children about gardening through the Junior Master Gardener program.  They have classes for students from kindergarten through junior high.

This couple also maintains the citys Marjorie Russel Education memorial garden.

menardgarden5Following a relatively wet year, the garden has grown tremendously.  My husband and I were there in early spring this year to help other volunteers do clean-up to get ready for the new season.

menardgardenOn this visit with the Master Gardener students who were finishing their course for certification, the garden was alive with butterflies.  Bluemist Flowers (Conoclinium coelestinum) is a must have plant for central Texans to attract butterflies.  I admit that I’m prejudged about this plant because it has been so successful in my own yard.

menardgarden1A Viceroy butterfly busy feeding.  In front of the Blue Mist Flower is Artemisia, another wonderful plant.

menardgarden2Monarch butterflies absolutely must have milkweed plants to survive.  This tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) is one of the showier milkweeds that is a beauty in the garden.  Unfortunately, mine freeze each year and don’t return.

On the right are rose hips from spent roses.

menardgarden3Lots of Zinnas are scattered throughout the garden.  Anyone who says they can’t afford plants should consider buying cheap zinna seeds.  The flowers reseed, so they keep on giving.

menardgarden4Behind the zinnas is Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha) which adds another dimension of form and texture to the garden.

menardgardencThe layers of plants, even with their intertwining, appeal to me.  Guess I just like a jungle look.  Not for everyone; I understand.

menardgarden6Not only do the Junior Master Gardeners meet here and plant their own plots, anyone in the community can rent one of these plots for $10 to $30, depending on what they can afford.  The city provides the water, and the couple in charge do the watering.  What a deal.

menardgarden8Another popular plant that appeals to pollinators is Salvia Greggii.  Not sure what kind of butterfly this is.

menardgarden7I think this is a Black Swallowtail.

menardgarden9This Salvia Greggii is called Lipstick.  The grower that came up with this name had quite an imagination.

menardgardenaBluemist Flower usually has lots of dead blossoms.  Doesn’t seem to bother the butterflies.

menardgardenb

menardgardendThere are several fruit trees in the garden, including this Fig.   Many of the plants and trees have been donated.

menardgardeneRock Rose (Pavonia lasiopetala) is a hardy Texas native with small flowers.

I admire people who give of themselves to their communities.

“Trump and Clinton are like divorced parents fighting over custody of us. And we just wanna live with Grandma.”  unknown

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In Fredericksburg

Recently my husband and I drove to Fredericksburg to scout out gardens.  My mission was to fine appropriate places that a class of prospective Master Gardeners could visit as a group to provide additional information and to observe different garden styles.

fredericksburgThe first stop was the Master Gardeners demonstration garden at the Ag Extension Office.  Although it isn’t the prettiest area, it shows a specific trait that is valuable for Texas gardens.  It does not receive supplemental water – only rain water.  Tough plants, only.

fredericksburg1Mostly native plants and a few others that have acclimated to the region are used.  It looked like there had been little rain recently.

fredericksburg2Mexican Feather Grass and native Redbuds are drought tolerant.

fredericksburg3Some of the plants here are Salvia Greggii, Purple Sage, and Cross Vine.

fredericksburg4The next garden was the Biblical Garden at the United Methodist Church.  It is small but a pretty spot.  Someone has done research to match the names of plants mentioned in the Bible with common names of plants today.

fredericksburg6Since Israel is arid, many plants that survive there also do well here.

fredericksburg7This sign identifies the plant with the yellow flowers in the former picture.

fredericksburg8A Pomegranate tree (Punica granatum) is referenced in Song of Solomon 4:14.

fredericksburg9Palm branches were used in John 12:13 and are common in Palm Sunday services.

fredericksburgaPapyrus (Cyperus papyrus) is seen on the left, and Bulrush (Typhaspp.) on the right.  Exodus 2 relates the well known account of the basket woven to hold baby Moses.  Both of these plants are considered possibilities for that with papyrus being the most likely.  It is also what was used for paper by the early Egyptians.

fredericksburgbAlthough this could actually be Papyrus, it looks a lot like Umbrella Plant (Cyperus alternifolius).

fredericksburgbbTrailing Rosemary is in the foreground and Purple Plumbago is growing under the tree.

fredericksburhNext we visited the Texas Rangers Heritage Museum, which is still a work in progress.  Flowerbeds lined the parking areas and around the pavilion.  But it seems I didn’t get pictures of those.  Guess I was enamored with the sculptures.

fredericksburhhThe plants in the flowerbeds were pretty predictable – Purple Sage, Salvias, and Cactus.  Several plants had died.  It will be interesting to see how this area is developed.

Next post will show more public gardens that we visited.

“Real Gardeners buy at least 10,000 plants over the course of a lifetime without having any idea where they will put them when they get home.”  unknown

Austin’s Zilker

In all the many times we’ve visited Austin, we had never been to Zilker Botanical Gardens.  So in June, the morning after we attended a Gilbert and Sullivan production, we walked through the gardens.

Zilker3Near the entrance from the parking lot is an above ground pond for water plants.

ZilkerI love water lilies but don’t want to bother with the installation, maintenance, and problems with animals that a water feature might involve.

Zilker4Looks like a dill plant, but in water?

Zilker1Very soothing to the soul.

Zilker2

Zilker5Another favorite – Hydrangeas –  cannot be grown here.  Rocky clay soil and extreme dry heat just don’t cut it.

Zilker6Queen of the Nile (Agapanthus) don’t make it through our winters.  Really lovely, though.

Zilker7This might be another variety of Queen of the Nile.

Zilker8Plumbagos (Plumbago auriculate) are from South Africa and do very well here in the summer but must go into a green house for the winter.

Zilker9Hardy Hibiscus (Hibiscus mutabilis), also know as Confederate Rose or Mallow Rose, is a super perennial in our area and evergreen further south.

ZilkeraAlthough Austin is only 125 miles south of us, the weather is much more tropical.  So the plants that grow there don’t have to contend with cold weather, most of the time.

Zilkerb A large section of the park has tropical plants and natives to the area growing in a naturalistic style.

ZilkercSome areas seem like they are in the country rather than the city.

Zilkerd

ZilkereTexas Pink Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculata ‘Texas Pink’)

ZilkerfMexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia)

ZilkergI like the look of tropical foliage plants but since they are annuals here, I don’t buy them.

ZilkerhPride of Barbados (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) thrives in Austin but doesn’t survive winter here.  So we grow Mexican Bird of Paradise, which has a similar look but not the bright color of the flowers.

Zilkeri

ZilkerjLove the bright red of what I think is a Firecracker Plant or Cigar Plant (Cuphea ignea).

ZilkerkFirecracker Plant or Fountain Plant (Russelia equisetiformis) grows in zone 9 or above.  It’s a nice filler plant.

Zilkerl

ZilkermA Walking Stick on a lamplight globe.

ZilkernI think this is Mexican Heather.

ZilkeroUnknown.

ZilkerpThese gardens looked very Austin, but I personally prefer that botanical gardens be more formal since my own gardens are not.

One note:  there was a large rose garden area, but the bushes were in sad shape and didn’t have many blooms.  I did not think that the roserosette virus had reached Austin yet.  It started in Oklahoma and is in most of North Texas now and is breaking rose lovers hearts.  So far, we have been spared.

“Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”  Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Never Met a Flower I Didn’t Like

A quick trip to Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center for their annual plant sale has me scrambling to find places to plant everything I bought.  Their sale is always a great experience, plus it’s reassuring to know you’re buying natives, which have a greater chance of survival in our Texas heat.

We also made a stop in Georgetown to see a local art show.  The show was small and disappointing.

georgetownBut the downtown area was quaint.  We strolled around and found a place to eat.  The above building was obviously a church at one time.  It now houses the local Historical Society.

georgetown2What girl hasn’t dreamed of a white picket fence?  Something about them says home.  Of course, the upkeep is a major deterrent.

The lush roses made it even more appealing.

georgetown1Old timey allure.

georgetown3A few of the buildings around the town square appeared old with some nice character.

georgetown4All along the streets we saw these flowers.

georgetown5They look like three petals but are actually six.  Bicolor Iris (Dietes bicolor) are also know as African Iris or Fortnight Lily.  They are so attractive and new to me.  The blooms are yellow with three dark purple spots with orange outlines.

The flower stems grow from a cluster of spear-like leaves.  Over time  a large colony forms.  Naturally, I had to find a nursery and buy one.  Actually, the local nursery, McIntire’s Garden Center, is excellent and would have been a great place to spend some time.

Because we’re further north, I’m anxious to see if it will survive our winter.

Bulb flowers are some of my favorites.  All right, all flowers awe me.

“In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.” Margaret Atwood

Cooler Temps

Twenty degrees makes a world of difference.  From 95 degrees to 75 degrees recently has perked up everything.  It’s nice to have the weather match the calendar.

Also, we were blessed with six inches of rain.

coolautumn6Turk’s Cap (Malvaviscus arboreus) is a winner.  It was named a Texas Superstar by Texas A & M in 2011.  And that it is.

coolautumn7Pictures of the garden really points out flaws.  In this photo I noticed the Hackberry tree growing in the Salvia Greggi.  I have since cut it down.  Behind the salvia is hardy Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia)  and several different rose bushes.

coolautumn8In front is Double Delight rose, then Tropicana rose with tall Knock-Outs in the background.

coolautumn5Purple Aster didn’t perform very well this year because it needs to be divided.  I’ve read that should be done in early spring.

coolautumn3The dead pods on the Purple Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea)  are beginning to bug me.  I was leaving them as food for birds this winter.  But I decided to cut the heads off and leave them in the flowerbed.  Then the stems can be eliminated.  That way the birds can forage on the ground, and the dead plants are not an eyesore.

The Strawberry Gomphera (Gomphrena globosa) bloomed in the spring, hot summer, and now into autumn.  Even though they are small, their bright color gives a great bang for the buck.  They also reseed generously.

coolautumnaMexican Petunias (Ruellia simplex) are still going strong.

coolautumncThey don’t bloom with a great mass, but the delicate tubular flowers on the ends of tall stalks are pretty.

coolautumndCannas have revived with some red flowers.

coolautumneBlue Mist Flower (Conoclinium coelestinum) fuzzy puffs continue to draw butterflies.

coolautumnfA few flowers remain on Pink Gaura (Gaura lindheimeri), but leaves have dropped off.

coolautumnkDuranta (Duranta erecta) is a hot weather plant but has seemed to like the cooler weather.  Love it.

coolautumnmWhat is prettier than these clusters of tiny purple flowers?

Several potted plants still look good:

coolautumnhRussian Sage, Turk’s Cap, and Kolanche in pots provide some color.

coolautumniFinally, the Bougainvilla has a few blooms.  Don’t know what the problem is, but thes are the first flowers this year.  Probably didn’t fertilize it.

coolautumnjAfrican Bulbine’s (Bulbine frutescens ‘Orange’) flowers wave in the wind.  All of these potted plants will have to go into the shed for the winter.

hibiscusHibiscus is looking good.  The wet weather is agreeing with it.

hibiscus1Love the color of the flowers.

hibiscus2This tropical Hibiscus has been in this pot for eight years.  The beautiful flowers make it worth hauling into the shed each winter.

coolautumnoIce Plant will die back during the winter.  I used to always have a start inside, but it has come back from the last two winters, so that doesn’t seem necessary.

ContainerPlants1Purple Oxalis (Oxalis triangularis) or False Shamrock has been in this pot for years.

coolautumn1Last week I was working at the Brady Master Gardener’s Butterfly Garden.  I thought that Monarchs had already passed through this area, but I was obviously wrong.

coolautumn2I love Maxamillan Sunflowers (Helianthus maximiliani) with lots of flowers on each stalk.  They grow in the bar ditches around here.

The cooler weather is great, but it also means winter will be here soon and flowers will be gone.  But winter is what makes spring so special.

“Holding a grudge is letting someone live rent free in your head.”  unknown