Orange Flowers

Orange is one of those colors that is hard to nail down in nature.

Personally, true orange seems to be too garish for my taste.  These old time Canna bulbs came from a friend about 12 years ago.  They do well in full sun, where they don’t flop over too much.

These were planted in the far corner of my backyard.  I like that they mark the edge of the yard perimeter; that they’re hardy; and that they are a reminder of old fashioned gardens.

I purchased this Orange Marmalade Crossandra (Crossandra ‘Orange Marmalade’) because it looked so cheerful.  It is tropical but survives in the heated shed in the winter.

When we took the pots out this spring, there were no flowers on it, so I didn’t recognize it.  Therefore, it was placed in the “plant hospital” until I could identify it.  Just haven’t moved it, yet.

Pine Lemonade Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘Pink Lemonade’ doesn’t look pink to me.

Different flower on the same plant looks more yellow.  The ruffled petals is what drew me to this tropical flower.  In Hawaii, tradition states that when a young lady wears a hibiscus behind her left ear, she is available.

Hibiscus are native not only to Hawaii but many other Pacific islands.  I’ve had this bush so long that I don’t remember the variety.

Same bush and same day as the last picture.  Nature surprises us every day.

Re-blooming Iris also has a slight twinge of orange or some unidentifiable color.

Bright or muted, color in the garden is definitely my thing.  Have you heard of Orangetheory workout gyms?  Not my thing.  Prefer working out in the yard.

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Autumn – Nope, Not Yet

Even though it’s autumn on the calendar, the weather here is still hot in the daytime with highs in the 90’s.  The mornings are cooler, which has perked up some plants.  There are still lots of things that are blooming.

autumn2The Purple Heart (Tradescantia pallida) has been covered with small flowers for months.  Garden designers suggest that wide flowerbeds look more pleasing.  And I don’t disagree, but there is a problem.  It is harder to reach into those beds and pull weeds.  Notice the green weeds.  Longer arms might allow me to pull them out with roots, but I can only break off the tops.

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animals5If I am totally still, you can’t see me.

autumn3In February of 2014 I bought a miniature Kordana rose at the grocery store.  I posted a picture and commented that it probably wouldn’t survive the winter outside.

autumn4But it did – in a clay pot, even.  That one got broken, so we’ll see how it does in this new fiberglass pot.

autumnA crow has adopted our yard.  He flies away fast whenever I open the door.  At the top of this Chinkapin Oak (Quercus muehlenbergii), maybe he couldn’t hear my stealth approach.

autumn1Orange Marmalade Crossandra (Crossandra ‘Orange Marmalade’ was an impulse buy.  It is heat tolerant.  That’s a plus.  We’ll see how it does inside for the winter.

autumn6Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ is in the Stonecrop family.  It’s a wonderful hardy succulent.

autumnbHere’s another pot on the back porch that has been here for nine years.  I keep meaning to plant some directly into a flowerbed.  If they survive the winter in pots, surely they’d do well in the ground.

In front of the Sedum is a Purple Leaf Shamrock (Oxalis regnellii), which has also been in that pot for years.  I do take that into a heated shed for the winter.

autumnaNormally Autumn Sage (Salvia greggii) isn’t that striking a plant to me.  But in full bloom, it caught my eye.

autumn7Finally, the Duranta bush (Duranta erecta) has more blooms, although not as many as some years.  The red clay pots under it were my solution to lift the branches up off the ground so I could mow beside them.  In this case, a wider flowerbed would have been better.

autumn9I really love this bush.

autumn8So do pollinators.

autumndThis is at one end of a long bed in the backyard.  The Texas sage or purple sage (Leucophyllum frutescens) is blooming.

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autumncNext in line is a Senna bush.  The long branches with a single yellow flower or a couple of flowers on the tip is very different from the bush behind it with large clusters of yellow flowers.

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autumngI think I have finally identified this bush – Cassia, Winter Cassia, or Butterfly Bush (Cassia bicapsularis).  I have guessed that it is Senna or Thryallis but have never been certain.  But I finally found a picture on the internet that seemed to match.

Beside that is a Flame Acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus var. wrightii).  If you want something that multiples, here’s your plant.

autumnhWhatever its name, it is gorgeous.

autumniAt the far end of that flowerbed is a Butterfly Gaura (Gaura lindheimeri).  Lovely.

Cooler days are ahead.  In the meantime, the crisp mornings are great.

“It isn’t the burdens of today that drive men mad. It’s the regrets over yesterday. And the fear of tomorrow. Regret and fear are twin thieves that rob us of today.” Robert Hastings