Southeast Texas Gardening

While attending the Texas Master Gardener Convention in Victoria, we visited the local Master Gardener’s demonstration garden.  Gardening in this region is polar opposite of gardening here in our neck of the woods.  The plants there tend to be tropical and they have arable soil while we have hard clay and rocks.  They must have weeds, but I didn’t see any.The garden is across from the airport and is located around a former officer’s club.  This part of the garden was constructed over a former olympic-sized pool, which had been filled with dirt.  The total size of the gardens is over an acre.

The contrast between shade and bright sunlight made photography difficult.

Some plants, like this Duranta (Duranta erecta), can be grown in our area, but it dies in the winter.  There, it lives all year.  This one was huge.

Great plant.

This plant was unfamiliar to me.  It’s Cestrum (Cestrum aurantiacum) which grows in zones 9 -11.  Really pretty but not a choice for me.

Henry Duelberg Sage seems to be a favorite all over the state.  It’s in the mealy cup or blue sage variety and is a perennial where we live.

Coral Bean (Erythrina herbacea Fabagae) bushes are simply gorgeous.  Definitely a hot climate plant.  In spite of its beauty, the beans are toxic and can be a temptation to children.

If it would live here, I’d give it a try.

Could not find a sign identifying these flowers but couldn’t pass up this picture.

At first, I wondered what was wrong with this plant.  Then I saw the sign.  Curly Leaf Leopard Plant (Ligularia tussilaginea) likes the heat but needs a bit of shade.  Aptly named.

Crested Leopard Plant (Ligularia eristata)

Ligularia (Farfugium tussilaginea “Gigantea”) are surprisingly in the aster family and are commonly know as the ragwort flower.  They have yellow flowers that resemble asters but aren’t the toxic ragwort found in some fields.

Cute bench.

Never could find a label for these.  The flowers look like they’re mixed in with larger leafed plants.

Another unidentified flower.  The red ones were lovely.

I’m sure that this Hibiscus was a new addition in preparation for this event.  Whenever an association takes on the job of hosting a convention, that means two years of work: planning and executing everything.  Kudos to the Victoria Master Gardeners for pulling off a successful convention and for this beautiful garden.

The next post will show more of the garden.

“Today I’m going to clean the house.  Oh, look, a flower (or book, etc.)”  unknown

City on the Concho

In West Texas, San Angelo is a town with a river, the Concho, which gives it many advantages.  Having a water source in an arid region is huge.  Therefore, the town boasts some green areas.

Although we’ve visited the town numerous times, on a recent overnight trip, we saw some places previously missed.

As we walked toward a Mexican restaurant (what other kind!) in the center of town, we passed the library, which has some large windows that jut out and are trimmed with this tile work around the door.  Always fascinated by symbols chosen to represent reading.

Outside the library is one of San Angelo’s ubiqutous painted sheep.  This one features children’s books.

I recognize pictures that represent Charlotte’s Web, Hank the Cowdog, and Alice in Wonderland.

The statement:  “Reading gives us some place to go when we have to stay where we are.”

Here’s the favorite of many.

The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts’ unusual building is constructed of many different materials inside and out.  The inside space features a main two story central area with smaller exhibitions rooms around it.

One current exhibit displays the work of local artist, the late Jimmy Don Cox.  Western paintings and sculptures show his eye for detail.

Another show called ‘Critical Angles’ by Cathy Cunningham Little from San Antonio contains unique art using glass, mirrors, and light.

The small pieces of glass and instructions for placement were mailed by the artist to the museum.  This involved a complicated placement of the materials to achieve the exact light forms.

The only light in the room came from the small lights above each set of glass.

From this angle, you can see some of the glass.  Beautiful.

The serene outside area is nicely done with landscaping and well thought out green space and hardscape.

Love this little girl reading.

The Aermotor Windmill Company in San Angelo still manufactures and constructs the old fashioned windmills that have character and hark back to the settling of the west.  Not like the intrusive giant wind turbines that are taking over our beautiful countryside and destroying land values.  I could go on and on about that.

This succulent ground cover has lots of pretty small flowers.  Looks like a type of ice plant but don’t really know.

A cowboy teaching a kid about rope tying.

Walking down the street from the museum, this horse sculpture made us stop.

The wood in front with the holes is from Cholla Cactus.

Several old buildings along this street have been renovated for businesses.

The next morning we attended a short seminar about Gardening with Natives.  Afterwards we went to a small nursery outside of town that has a demonstration butterfly garden.  I don’t know what I was thinking.  I failed to get an overall shot.  My mind must have been on what was for sale in the nursery.

This is a Blue Potato Bush, Paraguay Nightshade, or Blue Lycianthes (Lycianthes rantonnei) for zone 8b to 11.

Clever idea that is easy.  Just paint some molded forms that are used for garden bed borders.

Behind the caterpillar on the right is an Italian Basil and on the left is Curly Parsley.

Using a wheel barrel for a fairy garden has been on my to do list for a while.  Maybe this will nudge me to get busy.

A strong wind was whipping the flowers on a Morning Glory Bush pretty good.

Bush Morning Glory, Morning Glory Tree, Badoh Negro, Borrachero, or Matacabra (Ipomoea carnea) survives in zones 8b to 11.  Several years ago I had one that lived about three years.  Then it became too tall and cumbersome to move into the shed.  So adios to that.

The star of the show is always Pride of Barbados (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) because it is so bright that it’s hard to look anywhere else.

Pride of Barbados is a zone 9 tropical evergreen, but in zone 8b, it is a perennial that dies to the ground.  It’s on the Texas Superstar list.

I’ve tried one that froze.  Some people cut them to the ground in early winter, mulch them heavily and cover them, so I’m going to give it another shot.

“A happy person is not a person in a certain set of circumstances, but rather a person with a certain set of attitudes.”  Hugh DownsSave

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Eden

A small town in the midst of scrub brush in flat West Texas has a garden, which was the result of one man’s labor.

eden01The Garden of Eden has some surprising elements.  It’s been two years since I last visited, and it has changed some.

eden1A large plastic tank has recycling water – nice soothing sound.

eden2An old milk can is used as the spout vessel.  I’m surprised that it hasn’t rusted out.

eden3Flame Acanthus (Aniscanthus quadrifidus var. quadrifidus var. wrightii) is scattered throughout the garden.  Once established, it’s very hardy.

eden4No surprise that hummingbirds and butterflies visit the tubular flowers.  It is drought tolerant and even does well in poor soils.

eden5Coral Honeysuckle or Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) has become a bramble beside the metal archway where it was originally trained to grow.

eden7A banana tree growing in West Texas.  Hard to believe that it can withstand the dry heat or the winter temperatures.  Yet, here it is producing bananas.

eden6This was a volunteer plant that came up and no one has been able to identify it.

eden8Lots of pretty grasses.  Although many ornamental grasses last only one year, this one must be perennial.

edenaNative Morning Glory grabs hold of lots of bushes and intertwines in the stems and leaves.  Here it is growing among Mexican Petunias.

edenbThe yellow flowers are Texas Yellow Bells (Tacoma stans), which is a beloved plant that is native to far West Texas in the Big Bend area.  It is a tall shrub with gorgeous flowers that is drought tolerant and abides limestone soils.

However, cold winters have done mine in.  But I keep trying to save one.

eden02Although this garden has been turned over to the city and depends on volunteers for maintenance, the man who planted it is still very much involved.

edencTypical agave with Mexican Petunias behind them.  Agaves are not all that cold hardy, so I’m surprised to see them here.

edendTangerine Beauty Crossvine (Bignonia capreolate ‘Tangerine Beauty’) is a perfect fit for this part of Texas.  It is cold hardy, endures the hot summers, and is pretty, to boot.

edeneTexas Sotol (Dasylirion leiophyllum) is a common sight in pastures and is extremely hardy.  It has sharp edges, so it should not be planted close to walkways.

edenfAnother hardy plant, Salvia Greggii Red Sage has a pleasant scent, especially when brushed as one passes by it.  It is a semi woody plant that is native to Texas and Mexico.  It thrives in the heat but does not tolerant wet feet.

edengAs a soft plant for touching, Artemesia in the Mugwort family is a wonderful choice.  They are grown for their silvery-green foliage and for their wonderful aroma.

edenhMore Yellow Bells

edeniFour O’clocks (Mirabilis jalapa) were grown by the Aztecs for medicinal and ornamental purposes.  They spread profusely.  Where each black seed falls, a new plant will spring up.  The seeds can be seen in the picture where spend flowers have fallen.

edenjPalo Verde Trees (Parkinsonia aculeata) are desert trees that have pretty yellow flowers in the spring.  Maybe the mild winters the last few years have allowed this one to get a foothold.
edenkA clever tin man that I would like to duplicate but finding the right size cans could be a problem.

Although most of the plants in this garden are what one would expect to see in this area, it seems lush with the paths winding through tall shrubs and full plantings.

“Knowledge is knowing what to say.  Wisdom is knowing when to say it.”  unknown

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Bits & Pieces

Life is never static, although it may seem that way during periods of our lives.  The daily ebb and flow of a routine lulls us into thinking that we’re in control of events.  But daily reports of international news remind us that sudden changes can happen to anyone.

Moving my mother into assisted living this past weekend has brought thoughts of the march of time and how important it is to enjoy each moment of life.

autumnThe beauty of nature is a gift from God that prompts me into appreciating my life as well as loved ones and strangers.

The Jackman Clematis vine (Clematis x jackmanii) has rallied with new flowers after the summer heat has mostly passed.

autumn1A new tropical hibiscus was an impulse buy that I don’t regret.  Pink Lemonade Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘Pink Lemonade’ ) with ruffled edges on the petals is a beauty.

Of course, it means another pot has to go into the shed this winter.

autumn5As the petals unfurls, there is a subtle change to the appearance of each flower.

autumn2Even though true autumn has not arrived, cooler nights and mornings have revived some plants while others are beginning to change into the rust colors of fall.  Passion Flower Vine (Passiflora alatocaerulea) is perennial here that is a welcome sight in the spring to me and to the caterpillars of such butterflies as the Zebra and the Gulf Fritillary.  It is the only host plant for them, so they can chomp off every leaf of a vine.  It provides both the larvae and the butterflies protection from predators because they receive a toxic compound from the plant.

autumn3Still love the older tropical Hibiscus that I’ve had for years.  The color of the blossoms are lovely.

autumn4On the same day, the plant had the above orangey flower as well as this one that is more yellow.

autumn6The stillness of this dragon fly conveyed a calm and peaceful feeling.  The copper color is appropriate as the season slowly shifts from summer to fall.

autumn7I spotted this rustic cart on a bare patch of soil in someone’s yard.  I appreciated the artistic look and their attempt to improve the looks of their space.

I urge everyone to take a deep breath and just enjoy what you see around you.  The old saying, “Stop and smell the roses.” is still valid.

“Pride is a steamroller.  It’ll clear the path for a while, but sooner or later it’ll shift into reverse, and then…look out.”  The Sea Glass Sisters by Lisa Wingate

San Antonio Gardens, Part II

The hot summers and mild winters of San Antonio make it possible to grow tropical plants there.

sanaI fell in love with the Potterweeds (Stachytarpheta jamaicensis).  This is a red one.  It is supposed to be drought tolerant and grow like a weed.

sana1While standing in front of this bush for several minutes, I saw several different kinds of butterflies.  I think the one on the left is a Gulf Fritillary and the one on the right, a Common Mestra

sana3This Angelonia or Summer Snapdragon (Angelonia angustifolia) is an annual with upright flower spikes that resemble miniature snapdragons.

Only Angelonia from the Serena series can be grown from seed.

sana4Don’t recognize this plant.

sana5Bat-faced Cuphea (Cuphea llavea) gets it name from the dark area on the tip of the flower.  It takes a good imagination to see a bat face there.sanaccI tried to get a picture that would show the face, but I don’t see it.

They are native to Mexico and Central America and are only perennials in zone 10 and higher.sana6In this part of the garden, there are four square beds that form a large square with walkways in between.  Each square has the large tropical plant that probably stands 8 or 9 feet tall with shorter flowering bushes surrounding it.  The tall plants look like giant cannas, but they are probably something more exotic.  And none of them had flowers.

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sana7This Blue Potterweed has a Praying Mantis posing for a picture.

sana8Tall trees provide nice shady nooks.  The lady in red is one of several volunteer Master Gardeners working in the gardens that morning.

sana9Our group is observing huge Crape Myrtles and listening to the extension agent provide information.

sanajEasy to recognize Lantana is a good old reliable in Texas.  This particular one might be ‘Dallas Red’.

The unusual butterfly is an Orange Skipperling.

sanajjHardy Hibiscus do well in our area, also.

sanajjjWish I knew the name – no label.  In the Shrimp Plant family?

sanak

sanakkkYellow Jabobinia or Brazilian Plume (Justicia aurea) grows in light to full shade in zones 8b and higher.

sanalFrustrating when botanical gardens don’t have everything labeled.

sanallVariegated Tapioca (Manihot esculenta ‘Variegata’) is an annual except in zone 11 and further south.

sanalllIt is a non-bloomer that loves heat and the sun.

sanamLike the light play through the Elephant Ears, which are native to Asia and the Indian subcontinent.

sanammsanammmThe horticulturist at this botanical gardens must also love Potterweed, since they use it so much.  Here it is with Potato Vine.

A visit to a lush tropical garden is a treat.  Even though it doesn’t translate into useful information for my garden, it’s fun to see what other parts of the world grow.

“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.”  Napoleon Bonaparte

San Antonio Botanical Gardens

Last week I was in San Antonio for a two day plant seminar.  On the third day we had a tour of the Botanical Gardens.

sagardens014The gardens opened in 1980, so the trees are mature and the garden is well established.  It has an old world feel to it.

sagardens1This is a Barbados Cherry bush (malpighia emarginata) that has  matured.  Compare it to the puny little one I have in a pot.

sagardens3And there are the red berries I was expecting to see.

sagardens2Little Ruby Alternanthera (Alternanthere ‘Little Ruby’) is a smaller, more compact version of the traditional Joseph’s Coat.  It is perennial in warmer areas and can be grown in full sun or light shade.

sagardens4Bamboo Muhly in the back is cold tolerant to zone 8.  With airy, light frothy branches, it is pretty in the wind.

sagardens8Bamboo Muhly works well next to drought tolerant plants.

sagardens5Everyone’s  favorite:  Pride of Barbados (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) needs a more tropical climate than we have here.  Since San Antonio is further south,  many tropical plants can survive there.

Caesalphinia pulcherrima means very pretty.  And it is that.

sagardens6Can a plant be more cheerful than this one?  The colors are so bright that it’s visible from a distance.

sagardenscA large group of plants in different size pots made a bold statement.  While I didn’t recognize many of the tropical ones, at the bottom, the light green is a annual potato vine.

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sagardensdThe green plant in the center with small red flowers on long stems is Red Potterweed or Pink Snakeweed (Stachytarpheta mutabilis).

sagardensbWith zone envy, I had to remind myself over and over that I am happy with the plants that I can grow.

sagardensa

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sagardensRight off the bat, this bush grabbed my attention.  I learned that it is a Blue Potterweed (Stachytarpheta jamaicensis) from South Florida.

sagardens7The thickness of this Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha) convinced me that I should cut mine back in the spring and trim it throughout the growing season so it will branch out more.

sagardensekkYellow Jacobinia (Justicia aurea) grows in full shade to light shade and is not cold hardy below zone 8.

sagardensfA really cute little gardener statute.

sagardensgWith a huge tropical plant in the center, this display will lead us further into the tropics.

The plant in the foreground might be Black and Blue Salvia.  Not sure about the yellow flowers id.

The next post will be in the lush part of the gardens.

“This is maturity:  to be able to stick to a job until it’s finished; to do one’s duty without being supervised; to be able to carry money without spending it; and to be able to bear an injustice without wanting to get even.”  unknown

Quigley’s Castle

Quigley’s Castle outside of Eureka Springs is one of those odd tourist attractions that makes one curious enough to stop.

quigleyElise Quigley had described her vision for the house, but had to make a miniature model before her husband Albert and an architect could understand what she wanted.  Using lumber from the property, Albert and a neighbor built the house in 1943.

Elise and her children made the bricks for the outside from the collection of rocks she had accumulated since her childhood.

QuileyOn two sides of the two story home are large windows to provide light for tropical plants that grow in a three foot deep gap between the windows and where the flooring begins.  So the plants grow directly in soil.

Quiley2This shot looks up to the second story garden space.  Planks were laid to create shelves for pot plants.

Quiley3This picture was made from the second floor looking down in the growing space.

Quiley1In one corner upstairs is a collection of shells and plants.

Quiley5Some of the plants reach up to the second story.  I think this one is a Hibiscus.

Quiley4On one wall hung a collage Mrs. Quigley created from butterflies and shells.  It looks like some kind of resin was poured on top since it has a reflective finish.

Quiley6It actually works like a mirror:  The window and railing are behind us as I take the photograph.

Quiley7It’s a small house, so it’s amazing that they had five children living there.  Although two sons were serving overseas in WW II, so I’m not sure they ever lived there.

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QuileyaThe kitchen seemed especially claustrophobic to me.

QuileyaaAlthough Mrs. Quigley lived for forty years in this house, it is amazing how much hand rock work was done in the yard.

QuileybI also don’t know if this was done completely by her or if her family helped.

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QuileyccMr. Quigley inherited the 80 acres from his father and continued the lumber business of his family.

Quileyd

QuileyddHow was she able to get all that cement during the war and the years following it?

QuileyeLook at the size of these rocks.  It makes my body ache to just think of the heavy lifting involved.

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QuileyfAll kinds of trees with intertwining vines grow on the property.

QuileygA sign by this furnace provided the following information. In 1998 the brick chimney in the kitchen began to leak smoke, so this furnace was installed. It heats the whole house, two outbuildings, and the hot water heater in the house. The fire in the furnace burns a little over a half cord from October to mid-April.

Since Mrs. Quigley died in 1984, someone else must live in the house now or maybe it’s heated for the tourists.

QuileyggJust think of the time involved in all of these projects.

QuileyhLoose stacked rock fence.

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QuileyiHens and Chicks growing in this planter.

QuileyiiThe tall slim towers are a puzzle.  There must be some kind of poles inside to keep them upright.

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QuileyjjPyracantha bushes at the back of the house.

QuileykI do like the small rock baskets.  Chrysanthemums and Pansies add some color.

QuileykkPeriwinkle or Vinca flowers scattered throughout the yard brightens up an autumn scene.

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QuileynnNext to the parking area is an interesting tree with a burl.

QuileyoThe bright red tree is a Sugar Maple, I think.

QuileyooThis house and the yard may seem tacky to many people.  But I was impressed with the work behind it all.  It’s important to have a passion about something.  And it’s obvious that that she loved nature, specifically plants and rocks.  So I applaud her for living her dream.

“Never be afraid to sit awhile and think.”   Lorraine Hansberry

Roadside Garden in Costa Rica

During a noon stop at a restaurant, my husband and I decided to skip the meal and eat snack foods.  Three full meals a day were proving to be too much for us.

publicgardenhBeside the restaurant was a road leading up the hill to a gate and a private residence shown in the top left of this photo. On the other side  of the road was a park area.  Walking up the sloped road. workmen were toting huge bags of dirt or compose on their backs up to different areas of the garden.

publicgardencThe garden looked complete, but they were adding additional features.

publicgardennIn front of the garden on the road was the restaurant sign.  English indicated it caters to tour groups.

publicgardeneRed and purple flowers dominated making a bold, exotic garden.

publicgardenaThese looked like extra large Periwinkle flowers.

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publicgarden4Parrot flower.

publicgarden5Ginger, like we’ve seen all over the country.

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publicgarden2Enormous Angle Wing Begonia

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publicgardengMore tile flooring and seating areas were being added.  A covered area with benches provided a comfortable place to get out of the intermittent showers.

publicgardeniThese flowers look like Crown of Thorns, but the foliage is different.

publicgardenlLunch time was much longer than usual, so we stepped inside the restaurant gift shop.  Collette Tours was handling all in-country hotels, attractions, etc.  There were two buses with parallel itineraries, so we saw the other group often.  A 93 old woman from the other group had slipped on the tile floor and fallen in the restaurant.  Their group and ours happened to have a nurse.  Both nurses were on the floor with her as she lay immobile.  An ambulance from a distant town that had a good sized hospital was on its way.  Later, we heard that she had a dislocated shoulder.  She continued on the trip after an overnight hospital stay.

publicgardenoWe went back out to the garden waiting for departure.

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publicgardenfAcross the highway was another pretty landscaped area with a lake and mountains in the background.

publicgardenjThis strange tourist photo board beckoned for a photo.

All the parts of Costa Rica that we saw dripped with lush, green hills or mountains.  There were many gardens that showed great effort and design.

“You must do the thing you think you cannot do.” Eleanor Roosevelt

Coffee Plantation

There is no way that my pictures or descriptions are going to do justice to the verdant valleys, hills, and mountains of Costa Rica.  But here goes another stab at it.

Visiting the Doka Coffee Estate in the Central Valley provided a setting far removed from our Texas landscape.

costaR2The only way it was the same was that the strong morning sun made picture taking difficult.

costaR1Not sure if these are bananas or plantains.  Plantains were offered at several breakfast buffets.  The ones I tasted were good.  A little sugar and butter do wonders for lots of foods.  Or perhaps, the cooking process brings out the sweetness.

costaR3Hydrangeas were huge and sported many different colors.

We saw them growing in many areas of the country.  They seemed not to bother deadheading them.

costaR4Since I do not even attempt to grow them, they fascinated me.

costaR5Hydrangeas require too much water, time, and attention here.

costaR6But they are gorgeous.

costaR7These definitely look like Papyrus plants.  They aren’t growing in water, but the soil is probably wet enough for their needs.

costaR8I’m pretty sure the red flowers are Ginger plants.  They were another ubiquitous plant.

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costaRaThis young lady’s English was perfect.  She enunciated each word precisely.  Here she is explaining that they constantly grow new coffee plants to replace older ones.  As they age, the bean production slows down.

costaRbThis is the size planted in the fields.

Coffee trees are native to Ethiopia and were brought to the Americas by the British.

costaRdAs she talks, I can’t take my eyes off of the surroundings.

costaReThis red and yellow flower is Parrot Flower (Heliconia).  They have multi-colored bracts and varied flower structures.

costaRfcostaRg

costaRh It takes 2 to 4 years before a coffee tree produces beans that are ripe enough to harvest.

costaRjThe basket is hooked to a strap around the waist to free hands for picking.  Pickers are paid two (US) dollars for each basket of beans.  A good picker can fill 10 to 20 baskets a day.  They are instructed to pick the ripe red cherries, although some green ones get grabbed with the red ones.

costaRkThe pickers are Nicaraguan immigrants.  While working the fields for 6 months at a time, they are given housing with electricity, water, and schooling for their children.  Then they move on to harvest other crops.

Because of the political instability that exists in Nicaragua, there have been steady streams of illegal immigrants since 1978, the start of the revolution.  All immigrants receive the same benefits as natives.

costaRllThere were several food plants scattered among the coffee trees.  These are to provide food for birds in the hopes of distracting them from eating the coffee berries.

costaRlIn the background is a waterwheel.  This is part of the process of coffee production.  There is also a dry process that is used in other places.

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costaRmThe wet process uses water to sort the beans.

costaRnnIn the first step, the unripe fruit will float and be skimmed off.

costaRoThe skin of the cherry and some of the pulp is removed by pressing the fruit in water through a machine.

costaRooAquapulping removes the reminder of the pulp.

costaRpWe walk through a warehouse where bags of beans are stored.

costaRppcostaRqThen go out into a paved area where the beans are dried.  They are spread out in the sun to dry.  When it rains, they are covered with tarps.

When dry, the crumbly parchment skins are removed.  That’s what is seen in this picture.  We were there at the end of the harvesting and production season.

costaRrThe beans are being bagged to sell in the gift shop.

costaRrrThe different varieties are shown and explained.

costaRmmExtremely important to the history of Costa Rica is the oxcart.  Because of the hilly and mountainous terrain, it was the only way for many years to transport coffee and other produce.

Painting the oxcarts also has a long history.  At some point, a farmer noticed how a spot on a wheel made an interesting sight as it rolled along.  Then people got creative and tried to paint their carts with a unique design.

costaRqqAs we walk to the gift shop, more flowers speak to me.

costaRtcostaRsThe archway was covered with this vine.  The flowers had a waxy look.

costaRssThis vine looks like good old Crossvine.

costaRttMore Ginger.

costaRuUnusual bush.

costaRuuThere were flowers and the yellow “fruit” on the same bush.

costaRuuuDon’t know if it’s a fruit or not.  Interesting. costaRvv

costaRwA sidewalk is imprinted with coffee bean shapes.

costaRx

costaRyEven though neither of us drink coffee, this was a fascinating visit.

“Listen, Linus, friendship isn’t about who you’ve known the longest.  It’s all about the friend who comes and stands by your side in bad times.”  Charlie Brown