Quigley’s Castle

Quigley’s Castle outside of Eureka Springs is one of those odd tourist attractions that makes one curious enough to stop.

quigleyElise Quigley had described her vision for the house, but had to make a miniature model before her husband Albert and an architect could understand what she wanted.  Using lumber from the property, Albert and a neighbor built the house in 1943.

Elise and her children made the bricks for the outside from the collection of rocks she had accumulated since her childhood.

QuileyOn two sides of the two story home are large windows to provide light for tropical plants that grow in a three foot deep gap between the windows and where the flooring begins.  So the plants grow directly in soil.

Quiley2This shot looks up to the second story garden space.  Planks were laid to create shelves for pot plants.

Quiley3This picture was made from the second floor looking down in the growing space.

Quiley1In one corner upstairs is a collection of shells and plants.

Quiley5Some of the plants reach up to the second story.  I think this one is a Hibiscus.

Quiley4On one wall hung a collage Mrs. Quigley created from butterflies and shells.  It looks like some kind of resin was poured on top since it has a reflective finish.

Quiley6It actually works like a mirror:  The window and railing are behind us as I take the photograph.

Quiley7It’s a small house, so it’s amazing that they had five children living there.  Although two sons were serving overseas in WW II, so I’m not sure they ever lived there.

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QuileyaThe kitchen seemed especially claustrophobic to me.

QuileyaaAlthough Mrs. Quigley lived for forty years in this house, it is amazing how much hand rock work was done in the yard.

QuileybI also don’t know if this was done completely by her or if her family helped.

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QuileyccMr. Quigley inherited the 80 acres from his father and continued the lumber business of his family.

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QuileyddHow was she able to get all that cement during the war and the years following it?

QuileyeLook at the size of these rocks.  It makes my body ache to just think of the heavy lifting involved.

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QuileyfAll kinds of trees with intertwining vines grow on the property.

QuileygA sign by this furnace provided the following information. In 1998 the brick chimney in the kitchen began to leak smoke, so this furnace was installed. It heats the whole house, two outbuildings, and the hot water heater in the house. The fire in the furnace burns a little over a half cord from October to mid-April.

Since Mrs. Quigley died in 1984, someone else must live in the house now or maybe it’s heated for the tourists.

QuileyggJust think of the time involved in all of these projects.

QuileyhLoose stacked rock fence.

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QuileyiHens and Chicks growing in this planter.

QuileyiiThe tall slim towers are a puzzle.  There must be some kind of poles inside to keep them upright.

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QuileyjjPyracantha bushes at the back of the house.

QuileykI do like the small rock baskets.  Chrysanthemums and Pansies add some color.

QuileykkPeriwinkle or Vinca flowers scattered throughout the yard brightens up an autumn scene.

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QuileynnNext to the parking area is an interesting tree with a burl.

QuileyoThe bright red tree is a Sugar Maple, I think.

QuileyooThis house and the yard may seem tacky to many people.  But I was impressed with the work behind it all.  It’s important to have a passion about something.  And it’s obvious that that she loved nature, specifically plants and rocks.  So I applaud her for living her dream.

“Never be afraid to sit awhile and think.”   Lorraine Hansberry

Pretty Posies

Nothing brightens a day like a loved one’s smile or hug, hearing a favorite song, or a posy in the yard or in a vase.  Some might add chocolate to that list.  Okay.  I would.

Even though we are in the hottest time of summer, there are some flowers to enjoy.

whiteflowersSince last winter’s sustained freezing temperatures killed my Blue Plumbago, this year I’m trying a White Plumbago (Plumbago auriculata) in a pot.  It will go into the shed this winter.  Maybe I’ll be brave and put into the ground next year. whiteflowers2Something about white is so crisp – in the landscape or in clothing.  Plumbago is considered a tender perennial, so this is probably too far north for it to survive the cold.  But the heat suits it just fine.

whiteflowers7This color of Periwinkle or Vinca has so much depth.  A pot of these tucked in a semi-shady spot is a great way to add color where needed.

whiteflowers3The performance of the Mexican Tuberoses (Polianthes tuberosa) this year was disappointing.  That could be due to both the extreme winter and the fact that some critter keeps digging up the bulbs.  I replant them when I find them, but probably too late.

The bush with the yellow flowers beside the Tuberose is a variety of Senna, I think.

whiteflowers4Only two Tuberoses bloomed this year.  So leaning in close is necessary to sniff that sweet scent.

“If you eat in the kitchen, your house is always clean, and you go to sleep at 9 pm, it means you don’t have internet.” unknown