What Is and Is to Come

Last days of winter – maybe.  Warms days followed by cold days creates a confusing message to nature.

The dried blossoms of Sedum Autumn Joy can be sprayed and used in flower arrangements.  Silver paint makes them look classy.

Plus, Sedum Autumn Joy is a wonderful succulent that is reliable.  Green leaves are already popping up.

Bi-color Iris (Dietes bicolor) or African Iris or Fortnight Lily forms a clump with long sword like leaves.  It’s a native to South Africa, so I’m hoping that it will recover from the hard freezes this year.

Texas Flowering Senna produces tons of seed pods.  After giving lots away, these were left.  The strange thing is that with all these seeds, there are no seedlings that come up under the bush.

Texas Flowering Senna displays stunning yellow flowers that last for about seven months.  Can’t wait.

The leaves of Red Yucca are still green but the tall flower stems are dry.  The flowers leave a hard shell with black seeds.

Most of its leaves are still clinging to one Red Oak in the yard.  The strong winds haven’t dislodged them  yet.  Before long, new leaves will sprout.

There are several varieties of Senna.  Not sure which one this is.

Interesting flower seed pods and branch forms.

Clusters of dried False Foxglove seed pods make me anxious for the return of their white petals with pink splotches.This time of year wild creatures are astiring.  A group of wild turkeys passed through behind the house.  Stealthily, I cracked open the back door and poked my camera through it.

From the road wild turkeys don’t appear to have much color, but a zoom lens shows their pretty feathers.

Looks like two old gossipers speaking solemnly about something.

Guess mating season has started, meaning new little ones.

Can you tell that I am ready for spring with its warm weather and pretty colors.  I know, I know.  It’s still February.  Just daydreaming.

“If it weren’t for the fact that the TV set and the refrigerator are so far apart, some of us wouldn’t get any exercise at all.”  Joey Adams

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Oldies but Goodies

One of the pleasures of gardening is the return each year of perennials.  Success with plants is not always the case, so it feels good when it happens.

oldiesOne sure way to achieve success in the garden is to use native plants.  All plants are native somewhere, so planting native always refers to what grows naturally in your neck of the woods.

Clammy Weed (Polanisia dodecandra) is one of those wildflowers that comes up wherever it pleases.  If that doesn’t bother you, then it works.   I like the way the white flowers kind of glow.

oldies8Clammy Weed and Zinnas are easy to please – just a little water and sunshine.

oldies1Rose of Sharon also does well here.  Most of my bushes have the flowers that look like Hibiscus.  These have a rose look.

oldies2One of the best plant that gardeners in central Texas can have are Gregg’s Blue Mist Flowers (Conoclinium greggii).  Just step up close to them and have butterflies darting all around you.oldies3Blue Mists fill in spaces among other plants.  If you like that, you’re good to go.  If not, put them in a contained flower bed.

oldies44Another beauty is Turk’s Cap (malvaviscus drummondii).  It doesn’t look like it would survive Texas sun, but this plant has been in this spot for eight or nine years.  it’s tough.

oldies4The garden is doing well when all kinds of “good” bugs live there.

oldies5Bright red of these turbans always make me smile.

oldies7Behind the Blue Mist, Mexican Petunias (Ruellia brittoniana ‘Purple Showers’) keep expanding.  This is another one that needs to be contained if you have limited space.

This group all came from one cutting that I took nine years ago.  If you see something you like, then ask permission to take a cutting.  If it doesn’t survive, then nothing lost.

oldies6One of my favorites:  Henry Duelberg Salvia (Salvia farinacea ‘Henry Duelberg’) was planted many years ago.  I bought it long before I knew anything about it.  It is now a Texas Superstar plant.

Many hardly plants are found in cemeteries.  These were growing on a grave when they were discovered, so they were named for the name on the tombstone.

oldies9Ordinary Morning Glory reminds me of old gardens of the early settlers.  There’s a reason they have been around for years and years.  It’s impossible to kill them.

Just a few seeds from a friend and voila, you’ll have flowers forever.  But they are invasive, so beware.

oldiesaRock Rose (Pavonia lasiopetala) is one of the better behaved natives.  It stays where it is put and is not invasive.

oldiesbPretty little flowers that look more like hibiscus than roses.

oldiescStrawberry Gomphera (Gomphrena haageana ‘Strawberry Fields’) does come up profusely.  But it’s a small plant that looks good poking its head up among other flowers.

Neat and tidy in the garden isn’t my thing.

oldiesgCanyon Creek Abelia (Abelia grandiflora ‘Canyon Creek’) is fighting to keep its place in a bed since Pink Gaura keeps spreading out.

oldiesdThis bush in the back yard is so bright and cheerful.  I have sought to identify it definitively.

Finally, a nursery man had one like it and told me it was a Texas Flowery Senna (Senna corymbosa).  Other names include Flowering Senna, Tree Senna, and Buttercup Bush.

After about six years, it’s about 6 feet tall and wide.  Great plant.

oldiesfSmall green flying bugs or bees flit from flower to flower.  One is on a petal in the upper middle of the picture.

Wildflowers are just weeds.  So pick the pretty ones you love and plant a few seeds.

“One of the most delightful things about a garden is the anticipation it provides.”  W. E. Johns

 

Yellow in the Yard

Whenever I look at photos from the yard, sometimes color jumps out at me.  That’s why I’m doing several posts focusing on a specific flower color.

orangeyellowbKindly Light Daylily (Hemerocallis ‘Kindly Light’) is another great bulb flower.  Its spider like blooms last all day.  I usually avoid plant catalogs from northern climates because we simply can’t grow so many of their plants here.  But I have found one I really like.  Old House Gardens is a family owned bulb company in Michigan.  But many of their bulbs are grown in the south.  They provide specific information about growing conditions for each type of bulb.  Their newsletter advertising specials also has interesting information.

orangeyellow7Square-Bud Primrose (Calylophus berlandieri Spach) is a Texas native and has been a good performing perennial for me.  It tends to flop down in the middle of the summer, but don’t we all.

orangeyellow6Not really sure what this is, but I think it’s Parralena (Dyssodia pentachaeta) or Common Dogweed.  Please correct me if I’m wrong.

orangeyellow1New Gold Lantana, Lantana Hybrid, is faithful to return when the weather gets warm, along with the weeds and grass growing in it.

orangeyelloweThis Golden Showers Thryallis (Galphimia glauca) blooms all summer long and is a show stopper.

orangeyellowfAs it stops flowering, seed pods hang from its branches.

orangeyellowgThis Senna (I don’t know which variety) from a friend doesn’t flower all that much, but there are plenty of new plants each spring.  They’re easy to pull when small.

dragonflyOne of the bonuses of working in the yard are the creatures that fly around.  But to be clear, I only like the non-stinging and non-biting kind.  For some reason, mosquitoes love me.  Even when I spray with a Deet product, I come in covered with bites.

dragonfly2The strong wind was blowing this stem around, but the dragonfly hung on.

dragonfly3The outer part of the wings are transparent, so the grass can be seen beneath them.

Isn’t it amazing how many different varieties of plants and insects there are.

“Temper never mellows with age, and a sharp tongue is the only edged tool that grows keener with constant use.” Washington Irving

Garden Memories, Hopes

When the skies are dreary and the yard is barren, I look for any color, shape, light to lift my spirits.  Although we have not had the rough winter like most of the US, winter cold makes me long for spring.  Guess living most of my life in a dry, hot environment has become part of who I am.

afterfreeze1A few pots of Pansies are still alive – scraggly, but colorful.

afterfreeze2Green from Yellow Columbine sticks out between dead Woodland Fern.  In the spring, I’ll be mumbling about Columbine coming up unwanted in this bed.  Now I’m glad to see something alive.

afterfreeze3Good ole reliable Blue Spruce Stonecrop Sedum keeps on keeping on.

afterfreeze4Underneath these resting Daylily stalks lies the bulbs that will provide new stalks and gorgeous flowers in the spring.  The promise of new life encourages all gardeners.

afterfreeze5Dead Senna branches will need to be cut off to the ground in the spring, but now they provide seeds for birds.

winteryyar3Twirling Hummingbirds make me smile in all seasons.

winteryyard3

winteryyard2Not much rain this fall and winter, so I like the looks of some melting ice on tree branches.

winteryyardThe sunlight made them sparkle like diamonds.

winteryyard4All the Gomphera heads are white now rather than the bright red ones that will bloom in the spring.  Each of these hold about 100 seeds.  They will be so thick that thinning will be required.  I plan to move some to a new bed and to share some.

winteryyard5Pansies just amaze me.  I guess because I’m such a wuss in the cold.

winteryyard8We’ve had several Cardinals in the yard this year.  They are so wary that my attempts at photographing them has not been very successful.

winteryyard9Talk about bringing a bright color to the yard.  I love to watch them from inside a warm house.

“A lie doesn’t become truth, wrong doesn’t become right, and evil doesn’t become good just because it’s accepted by a majority.”  unknown

Senna Shrubs

Are plant names confusing for you?  Sometimes they are for me.  Another problem is when I receive a plant from a friend or pick one up at a plant sale for an organization and it isn’t labeled.  When I get several of these small plants at a time home, then I can’t remember what I was told or I get them confused.

senna3 This one came from a fellow Garden Club member a few years ago.  I’m sure that she called it a Senna.  But it turns out that there are several varieties and none of my pictures look like this one.  It isn’t very showy with a only few flowers sprouting on the stems.

senna1Now I think this bush is a Senna, too.  It looks like a Senna lindheimeriana.  The great thing about this one is that it is covered with flowers for months.

sennaBut one description of Senna lindheimeriana describes the foliage as grey.  These leaves are green.

senna4So, bottom line, I’m not sure this is a Senna.  I much prefer this one to the other so called Senna.  Both grow in full sun and are perennial.

So many plants are called by the same common names that using the Latin names makes sense.  I’m learning that is what I should pay attention to.  If anyone can identify these plants, I would love to know.

“Life begins at the edge of your comfort zone.”  Unknown

Yellow Flower Clusters

With no intention of doing so, I have three different shrubs that produce clusters of tiny yellow flowers.  The flowers and foliage even look similar.

backbush3The distinct characteristic of this one is that several bunches of flowers are the ends of branches.  I don’t know the name of it and don’t remember where I got it.  I must have bought it at the Garden Club plant sale.

backbush4Of the three bushes, this is my favorite one because the yellows are bolder and the larger clusters make them more noticeable.

senna5The above picture is a Senna (from Arabic sanã) from the legume family.  A club member told me that I definitely needed a Senna (Cassia corymbosa) because they are hardy and drought tolerant.

senna2The flowers are sparse without much water.

backbushThere are many varieties of Senna and some are used for medicines.

thallusEarlier this year I was looking for an evergreen shrub.  At a nursery in Austin, I was told that this Gold Showers Thryallis (Galphimia glauca) should stay green during the winter.  But Austin is much further south than we are, so it may be a perennial here.

thalusThryallis blooms from spring to the first frost.  It is in an open sunny area.  The wind whips it around pretty good, but it has survived its first summer.

Even when I try to research before I buy a plant, it isn’t always what I had hoped.  These three shrubs here are hardy and look good for long periods.

“Raisin cookies that look like chocolate chip cookies are the main reason I have trust issues.”  Unknown