Orange Flowers

Orange is one of those colors that is hard to nail down in nature.

Personally, true orange seems to be too garish for my taste.  These old time Canna bulbs came from a friend about 12 years ago.  They do well in full sun, where they don’t flop over too much.

These were planted in the far corner of my backyard.  I like that they mark the edge of the yard perimeter; that they’re hardy; and that they are a reminder of old fashioned gardens.

I purchased this Orange Marmalade Crossandra (Crossandra ‘Orange Marmalade’) because it looked so cheerful.  It is tropical but survives in the heated shed in the winter.

When we took the pots out this spring, there were no flowers on it, so I didn’t recognize it.  Therefore, it was placed in the “plant hospital” until I could identify it.  Just haven’t moved it, yet.

Pine Lemonade Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘Pink Lemonade’ doesn’t look pink to me.

Different flower on the same plant looks more yellow.  The ruffled petals is what drew me to this tropical flower.  In Hawaii, tradition states that when a young lady wears a hibiscus behind her left ear, she is available.

Hibiscus are native not only to Hawaii but many other Pacific islands.  I’ve had this bush so long that I don’t remember the variety.

Same bush and same day as the last picture.  Nature surprises us every day.

Re-blooming Iris also has a slight twinge of orange or some unidentifiable color.

Bright or muted, color in the garden is definitely my thing.  Have you heard of Orangetheory workout gyms?  Not my thing.  Prefer working out in the yard.

“The closest thing to eternal life on earth is a government program.”  Ronald ReaganSave

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Rising Heat

As temperatures heat up, I appreciate those flowering plants that can survive.  The high so far has been 99 which means we haven’t gotten into the crazy time, yet.

summerheat7This Pink Guara (Onagraceae Gaura lindheimeri) has gotten out of hand.  It is spreading rapidly now.  It was well behaved for about six years.  But it still looks so pretty swaying in the wind.  It will bloom continuously until the first freeze.

summerheat8And all kind of pollinators enjoy it.

summerheat6This long stem was bent low as this butterfly, maybe a migrating Monarch, hung on.

summerheat9The Crinums from the Amaryllidaceae family are blooming now but won’t last long.  They probably should be divided.  However, the bulbs are huge.  So I’m not quite sure how to accomplish that in the heavy clay without tearing them up.

summerheataVery few Gladiolas have bloomed this year.  The bulbs have been in the ground for years.  I divided a few in the spring, which is the wrong time of the year for that and too late for them to bloom this year.

summerheatbAhh, the tropical Hibiscus flowers are glowing.

summerheatcThis plant is about eight years old.  I love it.

summerheat2For years, we’ve had Barn Swallows nesting on a small ledge around both the front and back porches.  They make a horrible mess on the furniture and the front wooden floor and back concrete.  So this year, we paid a hefty fee to have the HardiPlank extended to eliminate the ledge edge.

The creative Swallows, who normally build mud nests on the ledge, made an entirely different kind of nest out of mud.

summerheat1We have been washing down all nests before they are complete or before eggs have been laid.  Hopefully, this will be our last year to battle them.

summerheatThe stems that look like palm trees are getting taller.  They are Swamp Sunflowers (Helianthus angustifolius) will reach up high and bloom in late August.

Everyone who sees them at this stage are fascinated by their form.

summerheatdThis year I discovered Soprano Lilac Spoon Daisies (Osteospermum ‘Osjaseclipur’).  It is a hybrid from the Osteospermum family that includes asters and daisies.summerheat4It’s easy to see how it got the spoon name.

summerheateThe petals may widen out on the tips as the plant or the flowers mature.  We’ll see.  It’s not winter hardy.

summerheat5As I was hand watering, at my feet was a Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia) – probably looking for a puddling place.

summerheatfThis is a scented Geranium or Pelargonium ‘velvet rose’.  It is in full sun until late afternoon.  Such a lovely flower with leaves that have a mild rose smell.

Hope your summer is enhanced by flowers.

“Have the maturity to know that sometimes silence is more powerful than having the last word.”  Thema Davis

Before the First Frost

Our first freeze was a few days ago with a low of 28.  So it’s farewell to flowers and warm weather.  Being forewarned by the meteorologists, we took an afternoon and hauled pot plants into the sheds.  Of course, that time included cleaning out the sheds and carrying some things, like fertilizer spreaders, that won’t be needed this winter to the barn.

Both metal sheds have skylights and blown insulation.  One has a heater sensitive to temperatures.  That’s where ferns and other tender plants are stored.  Plants that I don’t want to freeze but can survive some cold go into the other shed.

fall2yardOne final bloom from the tropical Hibiscus.  I know I show a lot of pictures from this bush.  But, in my defense, the flower color is stunning.

fall2yard4These small pots of Ajuga Bugel Weed (Ajuga reptans) go into the shed.  If the plants were in the ground, then they should come survive.  But I’m not sure how well they would do in the pots.  Most often, Ajuga functions as ground cover, but I can’t decide where I want to use them.

The African Bulbine (Bulbine frutescens ‘Orange’) definitely has to be protected.  It’s one of those plants sold way north from its home.  Probably, the big box stores intend for customers to use them as annuals.  Crazy me.  I get attached to plants.

fallyardhThese mums are local buys that will be carried inside and out as needed for decorations.  Then next spring, I’ll plant them in a flowerbed or larger pots.

fallyardiThis variety was bought at a grocery store – couldn’t resist.

fallyardjThe red tips caught my eye.

fallcolor4Roses were still blooming right up until the freeze.  These are Knock-outs with some Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia)  in front.

fall2yard2Katy Road Roses are central Texas hardy that survive blazing summers and intermittent freezes during the winters.

fall2yard3I don’t know the name of this rose, but it, also, is a hardy bush here.  Roses are actually easy to grow.  Until we moved here, I didn’t have a place for them.  They absolutely must have sun and some water.  Drip system works well.

fallyardgYellow Knock Out Roses.

fallyardePink Knock-Outs.

fallyardcI always dread for the last blossoms on Duranta (Duranta erecta) to die because I know it will be months and months until they bloom again in late July.

fallcolorSome of first signs of autumn here are the red berries and golden orangeish leaves on the Chinese Pistache tree (Pistacia chinensis).

fallcolor3The Red Oak leaves turning copper are next.

fallcolor7This is a different Red Oak, and it’s covered with acorns.

fallcolor5Finally, the berries on Possomhaw (Ilex decidua) get larger and turn bright red.

Nature is always in flux, as we must be.

May you and your family have time together to celebrate the blessings of life.

“Come, let us sing for joy to the Lord;                                             let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation.                             Let us come before him with thanksgiving                                         and extol Him with music and song.”             Psalm 95:1-2

Autumn is Awesome

The cooler days and nights with highs in the 60’s has rejuvenated us all.  Plus a few misty days and overcast skies has relieved all plant life from being attacked by harsh sunlight.

So I’m taking a break from the Arkansas posts to show what’s happening in the yard.

fallyardbMost of the Bluemist Flowers have faded but these are full and fluffy – reminds me of tiny pompoms.

fallyard12Potted Bougainvillea’s colors have deepened and are a tropical delight to enjoy.

fallyard11Even the Russian Sage has more blooms.

fallyard10Some flowers are bravely hanging onto an old-fashioned Geranium.  Wind gusts have been high lately.

fallyard9Salvia Greggi in a pot provides bright color.

fallyard8Boston Ferns in the back with a large Kalanchoe in front are massed in a corner by the house.  In front is Coleus and an Airplane or Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum).

The Coleus came from cuttings from a friend.  I’ve already taken cuttings inside to create another pot next year.  They will root in water and still make a pretty decoration while doing so. Also, I may need them to start again next spring since I don’t know how well this will survive in the house this winter.

The Spider Plant has been in this pot for years.  They prefer to be root bound.  Everything in this picture was a pass along plant except the ferns.  And those come from the original two that I bought, which have been divided many times over the years.

fallyard7Rock Rose (Pavonia lasiopetala) has a few blooms.

fallyard6Mexican Bush Sage (Salvia leucantha) has lost most of its leaves but still has some wonderful velvet blossoms.

fall2yard5The one I had last year did not make it through the winter.  So I’ve taken some cuttings and hope they will root in case a freeze does this one in.

fallyard2Gray Globe Mallow (Sphaeralcea incana) still has a few flowers, which surprised me.  I consider this was a hot weather bloomer.

fallyard3This little bee was flitting back and forth searching for an open bud.  Since this picture was taken many flowers have opened.

fallyard4Gray santolina or lavender cotton (S. chamaecyparissus) has some interesting characteristics.  It grows tight with little space between its branches.  I like the rounded shape and love the soft texture of it.  There aren’t many plants that I touch as I pass by, but this is one.

fallyard1Cooper Canyon Daisy (Tagetes lemmonii) has its main blooming in late fall with a less spectacular blooming in the spring.  It is drought tolerant and one tough cookie once established.

fallyardThis daisy is a Texas native that is found only in nurseries that carry natives.  I found it at Natives of Texas in Kerrville.  An odd quirk of this plant is its smell.  It stinks and reminds me of kerosene.  That made for bit of a smelly car on the way home from Kerrville.  But a plus is that deer stay away from it.

Cool days, some rain, and long lasting flowers make autumn, when we have it, special.

“Autumn’s the mellow time.”   William Allingham

Peek in Green House

Can’t wait to find out which outside plants survived the coldest weather we’ve had in many years.  Of course, I’m really hoping that most of the perennials make it.

shedBut the ones in the shed/greenhouse have been toasty warm and thrived.  The 8 year old heater did a good job of keeping the inside from freezing.

shed2There used to be a coiled hose in the greenhouse.  But last year I replaced it with this pocket hose.  It works so much better because it doesn’t get caught on branches and other things  in the shed.  It stretches nicely and is easy to use.  I’m not sure how one would work out in the yard with all the critters to chew on it.

shed3The blooms that were on the Ixora when we put the pot in the shed in early November are still going strong.  Love that bright color and the fact that the flowers last so long.  Of course, it is tropical and must have heat, although the dryness of the air during the summer here doesn’t seem to matter.

shed4The African Bulbine (Bulbine frutescens ‘Orange’) also is healthy.  Last spring I planted some sprigs in the ground.  They did well.  But what are the chances that they will come back?  They are not hardy to 7B, where we are.

shed5This large Aloe Vera always blooms during the winter in the greenhouse but not outside during the summer.  Can’t figure that one out.

shed6I usually see the blooms just after they’ve died, so they must not last a week.

shed7A new bloom is starting at the base.

shed8Kalanchoe also does extremely well in the hothouse environment and blooms better than when outside.  These are ready to be cut back.  So they will provide lots of cuttings to root for our Garden Club plant sale.

The white walls are sheets of styrofoam we cut to fit for insulation.

shed9All these Aloe Vera will be put in the Garden Club sale.  That large Aloe Vera just keeps producing all these pups.

shedd1Part of a fiberglass panel shows in this picture.  These allow wonderful sunlight to flood the shed.

shedd3The Boston Ferns have flourished better than in some past winters in the shed.

shedd4I have learned to move the Tropical Hibiscus away from the heat source.  Tiny white mites tend to cover it in the greenhouse.  But it does better next to the door.  That seems counter intuitive to me.  But it works.

Beside it is a Tricolor Butterfly Bush that I bought late in the fall and potted it just before storing it here.  Hopefully, it will live.  Anyone else anxious to get on with spring?

“Perennial:  any plant which, had it lived, would have bloomed year after year.”  Henry Beard

Alluring Tropics

Two large pots of tropical plants that I’ve had for years add a nice bright touch to the yard.  Even though both have to be carried inside during the winter, I think they’re worth the effort.

phillineThis Flame of the Woods or Ixora, which is a native of Malaysia, has never looked better.  Mine gets late afternoon sun.  It needs water once or twice a week, but can be over watered.

Ixora needs include acidic soil.  But honestly, I’ve never done anything to take care of that.  Organic fertilizer and mulch are recommended early in the spring.

philline2This plant has not grown very tall but doesn’t have any problems.  Its beauty makes it a standout plant.

yellowhibiscusEvery fall I debate whether or not to haul this tropical Hisbiscus into the shed.  The reason is that some winters it starts to look really scraggly in the shed and is covered with white mites.

yellowhibiscus1I spray the foliage with water or a pesticide.  Some years it looks better than others and recovers faster than others.

yellowhibiscus2This year it has been beautiful with lots of flowers.

Hibiscus prefer to be root bound.  Maybe it has finally achieved that after the last re-potting.

Daily watering is suggested, but I am not that diligent.  So it might bloom even more if I followed that regiment.

yellowhibiscus4All these blossoms are on the same plant.  I can’t explain the different color variations.  They were photographed at different times of the day.  Maybe that accounts for the light yellow to bright orange colors.

The women of Tahiti always have a hibiscus over their ears in  Gauguin’s paintings.  The tropics always seem so exotic and full of promises for a better life.  But it is possible to bring a little of that lush environment into your yard.

“Keep an open mind, but not so open that your brain falls out.”  Unknown – attributed to several different sources