Summer Continues

Summer drags on, but we did have a respite with rain and cooler temperatures one day last week.  And thankfully, there have been only a few 100 plus days since then.

summercontinues6Mexican Sage (Salvia leucantha) is doing well even though it may receive too much water from the sprinkler system as we try to keep other plants alive.

summercontinues7This one is probably ‘Santa Barbara’ since it has pale purple calyx and flower.

summercontinuesdI like that Drift Roses spread out low to the ground.  Another plus is that they almost always have flowers during the blooming season.

summercontinues8Coneflowers (Echinacea) have won a place in my heart.  These were planted late in the spring, so they’re blooming much later than the older ones I have.

summercontinues9Bees seem to be everywhere gathering nectar.

summercontinuescWhite Plumbago (Plumbaginaceae) or Leadwort looking good. That’s also Plumbago in the turquoise pot.  It was purchased in the spring and is still small but has grown quite a bit.

summercontinuesaThe Plumbago flowers aren’t as full as they were in the cooler temps of late spring.

summercontinues3The Flame Acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus var. wrightii (A. wrightii) to the left looks a little weary.  The Senna from the family of Fabaceae has perked back up.

In the background, the fields are white from searing heat and lack of moisture.

summercontinuesI love this bush and so do the bees.

summercontinues2The bright yellow flowers are so cheery.

summercontinuesbWe had a seven foot tower built for a rose bush since an aggressive climbing rose tore up the old, less sturdy one.  We pulled that rose up and will replace it with something else this fall.

summercontinues4This Common Garden Spider immediately claimed the tower.

summercontinues5A camera flash was needed to capture the spider’s web.

animals5Freeze.  Let’s play statues and maybe no one will notice me.  This Jackrabbit stays in the yard and sometimes has companions.  I’m okay with them as long as they just nibble on grass.  But lately, they have ventured into the flower beds and are eating plants down to the nub.  Chasing them off is useless.  They return as soon as I go back in the house.  Ah, the pleasures of country living.

“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.” Scott Adams

Peter Cottontail

Remember the children’s book The Tale of Peter Cottontail by Beatrix Potter?  Peter disobeyed his mother and went to Mr. McGregor’s garden to eat vegetables.  It was probably written to encourage children to obey their parents because in the end Peter didn’t feel well, was given chamomile tea and put to bed while his brother and sisters had bread, blackberries, and milk for supper.

cottontail2We have our own little cottontail in the garden.  One evening as I was pruning, he was munching in the flowerbed and didn’t seem afraid of me.

rabbitplanterRabbit flower pots have a whimsey that I enjoy.  The plants in this rabbit is Dwarf Sanseveria.  In the background is an heirloom Geranium and to the right is a pot of Airplane or Spider (Chlorophytum comosum) plants.  Their common name comes the plantlets that grow on long stems.

The plantlets are easy to propagate.  Just stick one in a pot of soil, and another plant is created.  In fact, I was getting so many Airplant plants that my husband asked me to stop planting the plantlets because that meant more pots to carry into the greenhouse.

It’s often considered a house plant, but they do great outside in filtered light or shade where there’s harsh sunlight.  They are not cold hardy and have to be moved indoors during the winter.  But the rhizomes will usually re-sprout if there’s not a long or extreme freeze.

cottontailAs my clippers snipped, the cottontail prepared to run but changed his mind.

rabbitplanter2This pot has Kalanchoe plant, which looks kind of sad right now.

rabbitStone statuary fascinates me.  I especially like the large ones seen in old English gardens.

cottontail3This cottontail is nibbling on grass.  If that remains his sole diet, I’ll be happy to have him around to clean out the grass in the flowerbed.  His mother lives in this same area, but she is skittish and stays out of sight most of the time.

“The federal government is like a handicapped turtle trying to crawl around and keep up with the rabbit, which is technology.”  James Breithaupt