Winter Color

Winter has been mild so far here, which is fine with me.  So there are some tiny bits of color scattered around the yard.

First, I must apologize for the quality of some of the pictures – not totally in focus.

Dianthus have survived a couple of freezes really well.

This Globe Mallow (Sphaeralcea munroana) has had some blooms that don’t stay open for more than a day.  It’s a native with dusty green curly leaves and is a good performer in both the summer heat and a mild winter.

Texas Flowering Quince (Chaenomeles japonica) usually has some flowers in January or February.One lone Daffodil has opened up.

Several years ago I bought this at a garden club sale and was told that it was an evergreen fern.  Turns out, it is a native Yarrow with white flowers.  But it is evergreen.

Pittsporoum in a pot provides some green, but the tips of the leaf edges are a little crisp from an earlier freeze.

Another native Yarrow has completely different leaves.  I think this is Moon Dust Yarrow (Achillea ‘Novaachdus’).  It is somewhat evergreen with dusty green leaves and does not reseed.

This hardy Ice Plant is amazing.  It’s been in the same pot on the back porch for years.  In cold weather, the foliage looks a little ragged, but it keeps on blooming even in freezing weather.  The pot is in a corner spot which protect it from harsh winds.

Yes.  I do know that this is a weed.  But the Henbit (Lamium amplexicaule) will be easy to pull out of this pot when I want to get rid of it.

I think it’s pretty, and it is color.  Can’t be too choosy in the winter.

Spectacular sunrises start the day with cheery color.

On a cloud covered morning came brilliant red on the horizon.

While we’re enjoying a mild winter, I realize that further north, a polar vortex has struck with devastating temperatures.  I pray for safety for everyone experiencing this.

“Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.”   Edith Sitwell

Preview of Spring

There are small signs of spring in spite of the fact that weather forecasts indicate more freezes coming up.  Several trees have already budded out and those buds have turned black from a freeze.

daffodilA few daffodils have already bloomed and grown ragged from the wind.  But there still more buds.

swampsunflowersSometimes it hard to determine from the first shoot of a plant what it is.  So it helps if you can remember where something is planted rather pulling up little greenery as weeds.  Spoken from experience.  These are Swamp Sunflowers, which go through some pretty stages.  After this, it will become thin, frilly leaves that drop over like a circular waterfall.

violetsJust plain old common violets that have a nice low growth with lovely whitish, purple flowers that rise above the leaves.

dayliliesOne of my favorites – orange daylilies.  Not only are they pretty but so dependable and easy.  Emphasis on the easy.

dandelionOf course, weeds are here with more on the horizon.  The dandelion has a soft inviting shape.

dandelion2Beauty comes in all forms.

henpitThe prolific henbit will always be with us.

cherrylaurelCherry Laurel in full bloom promises new leaves.

cherrylaurel2The entire tree hummed like a bee hive.

Our first evidence of spring is weeds.  That brings a somber reminder that I need to be outside with a hoe or a spray.

“What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it.”  Charles Dudley Warner, My Summer in a Garden, 1871