Candlelight Tour at Weatherford

After 37 years of a tour of homes at Christmas in a small town, it’s no surprise that it’s difficult to get people to open their homes.  At least, that’s what I assume, since most of the homes this year were small and not unique.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Cultural Center, so we always start at the museum.

Tickets can be purchased at Doss Heritage and Culture Center.  So that’s where we always start.

The western tree is always impressive.

One of the trees is this small pencil tree.

The Loving- Pinner house was built in 1857.  The house is well known because Oliver Loving, the cattle rancher who started the Goodnight-Loving trail, lived there from 1862 to 1866.  This small house with two bedrooms was where he and his wife raised nine children.

Fortunately, most of the year in Texas is warm or hot, so the children could have slept outside on the covered porch.  During the winter, they must have been stacked like firewood on the floor.  The cabinets with the glass doors were in the master bedroom.  The house still has the original porch, doors with hardware, high ceilings, and glass transoms.  But I’m not sure when these cabinets were installed.

This panel has older looking scenes, but there was no mention of age.

This Second Empire French Neo-Renaissance style house was constructed of hand quarried native stone.  Therefore, the outside walls are 20 inches thick.

In the small entry, a spiral staircase was handcrafted.  The banister was made from a single pine tree.  Using heat, it was twisted to fit the curve of the staircase.

The staircase in the back of the house leads from the upstairs down to the dining room.  The house features curved walls in most rooms.

The chandelier over the dining room table is original to the house and is from France.

Bathroom sink installed in old sewing machine cabinet.

This piano is old and extremely heavy.

The gingerbread man on this pillow is three dimensional.

It was a cold, rainy, blustery day outside, but people still came out to see the homes.

“Weather means more when you have a garden. There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking bout how it is soaking in around your green beans.”

Bygone Eras

Although Christmas has come and gone, I want to show the rest of the Weatherford Candlelight Tour that we attended earlier this month.

tour2weatherfordgThis house was built in the 1920’s but had major renovation in the late 40’s.  The present owners are in the process of restoring with as many original details as possible.

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tour2weatherford1These shelves  in the kitchen look original.  It reminds me of older relatives’ homes.  The tiles are obviously recent.

tour2weatherford2How about those prices.

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tour2weatherford4A tree full of sweet goodies.

tour2weatherford6This English cottage house was built in the early 1900’s.  It was enlarged and redone in 1989.

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tour2weatherfordaDining table decoration ideas seem endless.

tour2weatherford9tour2weatherfordbThis is the headboard in the master.  A small bedroom connected to this room was converted into a large walk-in closet.  We ladies like our modern conveniences and space.

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tour2weatherfordeAlong the side of the house by the driveway is another entry – probably from an earlier time.

tour2weatherfordfPoinsettias give some color to the side flowerbed.  Very attractive placement of seasonal flowers with the agave and statue.

tour2weatherfordhThis 1907 house shows the bygone lifestyle of the rich in the area.  There is a carriage house in the back.  This property has been in the same family for 107 years.  The great grand-daughter of the original owner lives here and has displayed furniture and decor from the early 1900’s.

tour2weatherfordiThis greeter sorta looks the part of a gentleman from that period.

tour2weatherfordjStepping in from the front door, there are two parlors, one beside the other.  I’m guessing one was for the ladies and the other for the gentlemen.

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tour2weatherfordmThis is one of the chairs that have been in the family since the house was built.

tour2weatherfordnLots of lace has been used throughout the house.  The rose folded napkin is clever.

tour2weatherfordoA nook in the dining room.

tour2weatherfordqA volunteer in a bedroom decorated for a child.  It’s actually used as a guest room.

tour2weatherfordpThis hanging up above the bed is rare antique Normandy lace and serves as a headboard.

Lace was an important factor in 16th-century world trade. The art began in Italy in the early 1500s as a pastime for upper class women. These ladies passed the skill along to nuns, who  meditated while creating the lace.  This also produced income for their convents. The practice spread from convent to convent throughout Italy until, in the late 1500s, the demand for lace products was great enough that private manufacturing workshops were established.

French laces were generally lighter and airier in design than their Italian counterparts, and by 1650, Alencon in Normandy was known to produce the finest and most delicate lace.

King Louis XIV called for the manufacture of vast quantities of lace and the industry grew rapidly.  Every woman in the royal court wore a headdress of Alencon lace.  Alencon lace became known as the lace of queens.

Today, a few dedicated women continue to practice the intricate techniques of point d’Alencon.  Most are descended from the original women who created the lace.  They learned the skills from older family members.

The creation of Alencon lace requires nine complex steps.  In the traditional manner, almost every step is performed by a different lace maker, each with her own specialty.  Final assembly of all pieces of the lace requires the skill of a senior lace maker. She must be an expert in all stitches and capable of blending the work of many hands into an apparently seamless whole.

tour2weatherfordrAt the next house, the volunteers dressed in a zoot suit and a flapper dress represented this1920’s home.  This was a quick walk thru tour with little of the house open to the tour.

tour2weatherfordsIn the backyard, I was struck by this volunteer.  He looks authentic to the old west.

tour2weatherfordtCheery Christmas vulture on top of a shed.

tour2weatherforduI like this little girl water fountain at Chandor Gardens.  Since I’ve posted three times before about these gardens, click here to read more detail about this wonderful place.

tour2weatherfordvOutside the Chandor home angels herald the good news.

tour2weatherfordwA grand dining room that seats twenty.

tour2weatherfordxThis tabletop setting of small owls is used each Christmas in the Chandor home.

tour2weatherfordyThe Pythian Home is a wow castle looking sight.  It was built in 1907 as a home for widows and orphans.  It is still owned and operated by the Knights of Pythias, a fraternal organization.  It currently houses children temporarily placed there by the court until their parents can care for them.

tour2weatherfordzThe rooms are massive with wide, grand staircases.  The furnishings seem to be original or at least, in that style.  The heavy brocade drapes and satin covered settees invoke a bygone era.  Of course, we only saw the guest rooms reserved for visiting board members.  So I don’t know what the children’s rooms look like.

tour2weatherfordzzOur next stop was the Museum of the Americas. It’s a small building crammed full of artifacts from ancient people groups from South America to North America.  The owners and collectors are husband and wife professors.  It deserves more time to explore than we had left.

Thanks for indulging me on this tour.  I appreciate your time in looking at my posts.  May 2015 be filled with joy and peace for you and your family.

“Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every new year find you a better man.”  Ben Franklin

Merry Christmas

wreathmerrychristmas“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders.  And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.”  Isaiah 9:6